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sazc

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It's best to wait until you're part of a Scrum team before considering pursuing any certifications. You don't really learn agile until you're in a working setting.
I don't disagree, concept is always different than implementation, however, having any agile anything on your resume is a garantee for getting the interview and moving to the top of the candidate pool - regardless of weather you've been on a team that does agile/have direct experience in it.

It's just super hot right now.
 

nicksaiz65

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I have no idea if Scrum is taught in my senior Engineering courses. From what I've heard the idea of Software Engineering I is working in a team the whole semester to build a project. They definitely cover Agile in there. Not so sure about Scrum though
 

sazc

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I have no idea if Scrum is taught in my senior Engineering courses. From what I've heard the idea of Software Engineering I is working in a team the whole semester to build a project. They definitely cover Agile in there. Not so sure about Scrum though
On an agile team there is always a scrum master. That person knows how to prioritize stories, assign points, clarify requirements, etc. If they covert agile in class, they will cover all aspects, including scrum master.

Agile teams do development during a "Sprint" a Sprint has anywhere from 1 to 4 weeks in it. At my work we have two week sprints. Everyday we have a scrum, where the developers get together and go over what they're working on how far they've gotten if there's any blocks and they make requests of the scrum Master to find out information for them.
 

marmel75

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@marmel75 agreed except I haven't felt that c# tug over the Java tug, bit I'm sure it is locale and legacy code, as you mentioned.

I've only seen snippets of python, don't know if it's good to write an entire app.

But I've never (honestly) thought a solid application (server side at least) could be written in anything less than c/c++. To me that language just seems to make the most sense, computing/bit wise.

Sure, sure, web apps have Java back ends, and that's okay. But real computing? You need c/c++ for that.

These days it seems to be all about agile, dev ops, the pipeline, etc
Well, i mean if we are talking about operating systems and other things like that needing low level access to hardware, drivers, etc then sure c/c++ are your best bets...but for designing normal applications (other than games where C++ rules) i would hate to be developing those in C/C++...you are talking double, triple or quadruple the code base and having to manage memory on your own...not something most developers would want to sign up for. In addition the speed advantages of C++ are getting smaller every day over something like C#...

When every little bit of speed matters like with intense 3D video games and rendering then it makes sense to use C/C++, outside of that, not so much.

Also Native Python is very slow as its an interpreted language but there is something called Cython which is a superset of Python that uses Python wrappers around C/C++ code that makes it up to 100 times faster.
 
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evan12

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Learn agile and scrum. Scrum master, that's going to get you the biggest for in the door.
Dev ops pipeline. Understand it. Understand the pieces of it (even if you can't implement, that's okay) this will give you an edge right now. Also understand/learn how to facilitate cultural change. That's always a BIG deal. The baby boomers try HARD to stick to their routines. They need the millennials to get in there and effectively shake things up for the better.
DeoOp engineer is cool name for very low skilled profession , I dont recommend it to any one want to be good software developer and architecture. DevOps spend their time writing scripts or simple apps with some integrations . you will never get a chance to work on complex project. So your skills will stay basic
 

sazc

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DeoOp engineer is cool name for very low skilled profession , I dont recommend it to any one want to be good software developer and architecture. DevOps spend their time writing scripts or simple apps with some integrations . you will never get a chance to work on complex project. So your skills will stay basic
Is 'dev ops engineer' even a profession?
From what I understand, it's an add on to being an actual engineer and working on projects. I don't see how you can fill a 40 hour work week being a dev ops engineer', especially once the pipeline is set up?

From what I understand it's an add-on to your resume, and an an additional skill set that employers value
 

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DeoOp engineer is cool name for very low skilled profession , I dont recommend it to any one want to be good software developer and architecture. DevOps spend their time writing scripts or simple apps with some integrations . you will never get a chance to work on complex project. So your skills will stay basic
DevOps has different meaning among companies. In fact there are some devop roles which having nothing to do with coding.
 

nicksaiz65

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@Papa_smu @marmel75

Can you guys tell me what code reviews/presentations are like so I know what to expect in the workplace? How frequent are they? Is it stressful?

Tomorrow or Tuesday I'm supposed to present a small demo of the project I've been working on. I then have to show my code and my thought process behind it. I also have to talk about my plans on how to implement it for the next stage of the project.

Is this kind of like what the workplace is like or is it completely different?
 

Papa_smu

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@Papa_smu @marmel75

Can you guys tell me what code reviews/presentations are like so I know what to expect in the workplace? How frequent are they? Is it stressful?

Tomorrow or Tuesday I'm supposed to present a small demo of the project I've been working on. I then have to show my code and my thought process behind it. I also have to talk about my plans on how to implement it for the next stage of the project.

Is this kind of like what the workplace is like or is it completely different?
It really depends on the company. Where I work is more loose compared to other large companies since we have much control over the processes. Thus, requests from the business are a bit less formal, and whomever owns the app is creating the work. Typically, if I'm doing a pull request, I have the senior dev take a look at it before it's merged into the development branch. So that's sorta a code review?
 
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sazc

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@Papa_smu @marmel75

Can you guys tell me what code reviews/presentations are like so I know what to expect in the workplace? How frequent are they? Is it stressful?

Tomorrow or Tuesday I'm supposed to present a small demo of the project I've been working on. I then have to show my code and my thought process behind it. I also have to talk about my plans on how to implement it for the next stage of the project.

Is this kind of like what the workplace is like or is it completely different?
Hopefully you work with some supportive people who dont make your mistakes personal (not that you'd ever make a mistake ;) )

Just roll with the code review. If they find stuff you'll need to fix it. Look at it as a learning experience and learn.
 

marmel75

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Is 'dev ops engineer' even a profession?
From what I understand, it's an add on to being an actual engineer and working on projects. I don't see how you can fill a 40 hour work week being a dev ops engineer', especially once the pipeline is set up?

From what I understand it's an add-on to your resume, and an an additional skill set that employers value
DevOps means different things at different places...in general the role requires both programming and business ability as you will act as an intermediary between the programmers and consumers of the product and ensure the programming team fully understands what it is the consumers need from the application. At least in my area its a high paying role...
 

evan12

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Is 'dev ops engineer' even a profession?
From what I understand, it's an add on to being an actual engineer and working on projects. I don't see how you can fill a 40 hour work week being a dev ops engineer', especially once the pipeline is set up?

From what I understand it's an add-on to your resume, and an an additional skill set that employers value
Now a days in many fast paced software comapies there is a complete department of DevOps with too many DevOps engineers spend their time building infrastructure for continue integration and continues delivery operations . I personally worked on some DevOps tasks, the the long run it is not rewarding , however these days DevOps are in demand , so I worked on some of their projects to be able to list it on my resume if I need that.
 

nicksaiz65

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Since this is basically becoming the SS Computer Science thread, I thought I would elicit an opinion from here.

I have a choice between two electives next semester. I can either take Artificial Intelligence or Software Reverse Engineering. If it were you all, which one would you take?

I'm leaning towards AI, honestly. It would be harder than Software Reverse Engineering but it seems a bit cooler. If I do that I am most definitely gonna have to do a review on Depth First Search and Breadth First Search cause I hear that's all over the first half of the class.
 

GeeMale

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Funny this thread came up as I'm starting 16 week coding school Aug 28th-Dec 20th.

Has anyone here worked for FANG(Facebook,Amazon,Netflix,Google) as a developer who doesn't have a bachelor's ?
 
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sazc

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Since this is basically becoming the SS Computer Science thread, I thought I would elicit an opinion from here.

I have a choice between two electives next semester. I can either take Artificial Intelligence or Software Reverse Engineering. If it were you all, which one would you take?

I'm leaning towards AI, honestly. It would be harder than Software Reverse Engineering but it seems a bit cooler. If I do that I am most definitely gonna have to do a review on Depth First Search and Breadth First Search cause I hear that's all over the first half of the class.
AI
 

sazc

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Funny this thread came up as I'm starting 16 week coding school Aug 28th-Dec 20th.

Has anyone here worked for FANG(Facebook,Amazon,Netflix,Google) as a developer who doesn't have a bachelor's ?
while I can't answer the question directly I can tell you that all of my friends who are in professional positions who don't have college degrees are always afraid of being the first man fired or being rejected as a candidate because they don't have a degree. This is mostly due to the fact that the candidate pool is full of people who actually have degrees.
where I work now, I have a co-worker, and she seems to be technically on top of it, but she's always worried about making waves because she doesn't have a degree so she doesn't feel it would be as easy to get another job in tech
I have a lot of friends who work in silicon valley and I can tell you that all of them have degrees, but I do not know the sum total of employees that work at any one of those places, without a degree you will get paid less
 

nicksaiz65

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Idk if this is relevant to any of you all, but I just finished my first project this morning(the basic part of it at least) and the lesson I learned is "don't try to reinvent the wheel." I read and based my code off previous working code so that I knew how to structure and implement it. Made it so much easier to implement instead of just coding from scratch. Can't believe I haven't been doing this before.
 

GeeMale

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while I can't answer the question directly I can tell you that all of my friends who are in professional positions who don't have college degrees are always afraid of being the first man fired or being rejected as a candidate because they don't have a degree. This is mostly due to the fact that the candidate pool is full of people who actually have degrees.
where I work now, I have a co-worker, and she seems to be technically on top of it, but she's always worried about making waves because she doesn't have a degree so she doesn't feel it would be as easy to get another job in tech
I have a lot of friends who work in silicon valley and I can tell you that all of them have degrees, but I do not know the sum total of employees that work at any one of those places, without a degree you will get paid less
Even if someone 's skill levels is the same, the one without a degree will get paid less? That sucks and is stupid.
 
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