Computer science/programming

GeeMale

Senior Don Juan
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Idk if this is relevant to any of you all, but I just finished my first project this morning(the basic part of it at least) and the lesson I learned is "don't try to reinvent the wheel." I read and based my code off previous working code so that I knew how to structure and implement it. Made it so much easier to implement instead of just coding from scratch. Can't believe I haven't been doing this before.
Where you getting your material from, udemy? That's where I first started for Web Development
 

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nicksaiz65

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Where you getting your material from, udemy? That's where I first started for Web Development
For this project I used Udemy and TutsPlus. Also the free Unity tutorials at UnityLearn. I took the basis of their code(as a reference, not copying) and put my own spin on things to make it work. YouTube as well for when I couldn't get the syntax to work.

Although I'm still a student so the more experienced programmers on here may have a different opinion.
 

sosousage

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For this project I used Udemy and TutsPlus. Also the free Unity tutorials at UnityLearn. I took the basis of their code(as a reference, not copying) and put my own spin on things to make it work. YouTube as well for when I couldn't get the syntax to work.

Although I'm still a student so the more experienced programmers on here may have a different opinion.
so youre making games?

i also use unity, i also used other game engines using unreal, i love making games

that all is more my hobby than occupation though

but there are some many unity jobs so its not bad investment either
 

nicksaiz65

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so youre making games?

i also use unity, i also used other game engines using unreal, i love making games

that all is more my hobby than occupation though

but there are some many unity jobs so its not bad investment either
Yup that's what I'm doing at my internship man. It's really really fun.

Being a Game Programmer would be dope and it pays well but I hear it's extremely stressful work.

I've never used Unreal but I've always heard good things about it. Do you prefer Unreal or Unity?
 

sosousage

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Yup that's what I'm doing at my internship man. It's really really fun.

Being a Game Programmer would be dope and it pays well but I hear it's extremely stressful work.

I've never used Unreal but I've always heard good things about it. Do you prefer Unreal or Unity?
i preferred unreal, sticked with unity cause its more popular and therefore better investment.

However now i prefer Unity. unreal may be "better"engine technically, it has native MMO/MMORPG/rooms/matchmaking/dedicated server features, it has many developed tools built in, it has blueprints, it develops games that have faster performance. and epic games is good as hell at making games (and marketing) and they banked so crazy on Fortnite that they donated 1.2 million to blender with no any strings attached.


unity develops games with worse performance, has no multiplayer (outdated unet) and their company isnt even making games, let alone world-wide popular first class games like Epic's Fortnite.

But I prefer coding games in Unity. The process is faster for me.
 
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sazc

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What would you say is a suitable benchmark for guaging your aptitude for programming?
yes, and while I understand your pain, there are theories and concepts that the university engineer is going to be taught that a self-taught developer will probably not go over because it's not required.

it's all the information, the sum total of information you get that shapes your approach as an engineer.

at the last company that I work for, you could not be promoted to any kind of management if you didn't at least hold a masters. Some of these companies simply do not joke around
 

Papa_smu

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To the OP, I know you have a lot of questions are pretty anxious about your future career. But what it really comes down to is time in the chair. Because, like all professions, it's just work. Some people get lucky and enjoy their work.
 

cruzinV

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People need to stop thinking that software engineering is a blue collar job that you can pick up after a few online classes or some "certificate". SW engineering requires a high aptitude for complex problem solving, quick learning, dedication, YEARS of practice etc. You have to be smart, not plumber or electrician smart, but smart on another level. The truth is, the VAST majority of people to who try to become SW engineers are going to fail because they dont have the BRAINS. Period.
 
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switch7

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What do you do and what does your day entail?
Front end dev, I use react, redux, graph ql and immutable js.. so basically all javascript.

Day entails standup, three amigos session with the other teams like ba’s, qa’s and ux, then back to coding, usually in pairs. It’s an agile environment so quite relaxed and enjoyable place to work.
 

rayv12

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I went to a CS-focused college and thought it was the perfect fit for me - 3 year program, nice events at school, and people who graduate make big money... but I had to withdraw because of my grades.

I just had a tough time learning Java. Had I known it would be a problem, I would've studied it in high school. The tough thing is, that even the school's advertising made it seem like no prior experience was necessary. So many students like me came in with no prior experience. In first quarter, we had a final project - and I just didn't know enough to make enough contribution. I contributed one class to the project, which didn't even get used. The final project was to make a "console-based" (text based) version of Monopoly in Java. I failed both that class and the initial Algebra class, so I had to retake them both the next quarter.

Quarter 2 went better. I passed the CS class, we had a different teacher and I did learn better. I failed Algebra again, but only because I missed two grades for showing up a bit late. Had I missed one less day, I would've passed. But this quarter we had a particular class that was indeed nastier for me, and it was a Networking class - we learned about IP addresses and Cisco Packet Tracer. I heard from students in the class that Packet Tracer was a bad piece of software. While I believe it, and it doesn't surprise me, I just couldn't do much of the assignments because I did what I was told in the class, it didn't work, I'd go to the student coaching, and just wouldn't be able to get it. Granted, the coaches didn't hand anyone a solution, but they didn't exactly help me either.

In my 3rd quarter, I took the next Java class up. OK, I'm calling these Java classes even though the teachers said "this isn't a Java class," but let's be real: they're ****ing Java classes, for all practical purposes. Sure, the concepts learned within can be applied to multiple languages, but knowledge of Java still would've helped, as I stated. Things seemed to go well for a while, but the road block came with my student grader. She was a girl in my same class (of total students, set to graduate in 2020) who had taken the class the previous quarter. And the problem with her was this: My teacher often set many assignment grades to be hit-or-miss, and so I'd get a 0 on an assignment that I submitted. If you get a 0 before the due date, you get to fix it. My coach/grader often times wouldn't regrade my assignments when I re-submitted them. As a result, many of my grades stayed 0 when they should've been well over 60. It didn't help that not only was I doing poorly in that quarter's math class, I failed the Networking class again. So by the last two weeks of the quarter, I just knew I was going to fail. So I ended up withdrawing from the school, and by extension, moving out of the student-sponsored housing. It was a real pain in the ass, I decided to find a new place to live because moving back across the country to my Dad's house (which won't belong to us anyway in a few months) was neither an appealing option nor one that made sense.

The college was also a sausage fest. There was only about 1 girl for every 20 of us guys there. I legit got no action the entire time I was there, and I hardly even had time for it anyway.

The degree I chose was more business focused, so I want to pursue finance, etc after going to gen eds at community college for two years.

Am I just not cut out for CS stuff, or was I just not taught it well? I understood at least Java half the time, hell, it was even fun sometimes, but really the pacing of the classes was at a mile a minute and overwhelming. That, and the other schools in my area have equally good CS programs and were less expensive than the one I was at. So that begs the question: could I actually do CS/programming? Did I just go to the wrong school? Or should I just cut my losses? People I graduated high school with are going to finish their second year this Spring, and I have de facto nothing - almost none of my gen ed credits from the previous school will transfer, so when I do start school this Spring or Summer it's going to be a fresh start.
I am currently working as a technologist. I’ve learnt JavaSE, JavaEE SPRING etc, C/C++, C#, DotNet, Angular,MYSQL, Oracle and a little bit of everything else.

I have a degree in electronics Engineering.

I haven’t read much but I saw that you having trouble with Java. Java is not quite straight forward there are rules and things you need to know before you do stuff ie a lot of concepts

Best place to begin with
http://moocfi.github.io/courses/2013/programming-part-1/

Next you read the oracle tutorials on JAVASE

you will be better than 75% people who claim they know java.

JAVAEE is a different monster and I am still learning new things everyday so won’t be commenting on it.

C/C++ I’ve never used it much but practice my data Structures with it but it takes time to get things right here but it gives you solid foundation. But once in a while implement the ideas in java, typescript(Angular8)

HTML/CSS is fairly simple so won’t comment.

One thing I don’t know is python and it will really make a difference if you could do python(automation + ML) with java&angular

Good luck! College is an experience doesn’t mean anything if needed take some time off to think.

A year or two off after your college with a few random jobs, money saved up in the account gives you an edge over others keeps you focused and your mind clear.
 

stormrider

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I went to a CS-focused college and thought it was the perfect fit for me - 3 year program, nice events at school, and people who graduate make big money... but I had to withdraw because of my grades.

I just had a tough time learning Java. Had I known it would be a problem, I would've studied it in high school. The tough thing is, that even the school's advertising made it seem like no prior experience was necessary. So many students like me came in with no prior experience. In first quarter, we had a final project - and I just didn't know enough to make enough contribution. I contributed one class to the project, which didn't even get used. The final project was to make a "console-based" (text based) version of Monopoly in Java. I failed both that class and the initial Algebra class, so I had to retake them both the next quarter.

Quarter 2 went better. I passed the CS class, we had a different teacher and I did learn better. I failed Algebra again, but only because I missed two grades for showing up a bit late. Had I missed one less day, I would've passed. But this quarter we had a particular class that was indeed nastier for me, and it was a Networking class - we learned about IP addresses and Cisco Packet Tracer. I heard from students in the class that Packet Tracer was a bad piece of software. While I believe it, and it doesn't surprise me, I just couldn't do much of the assignments because I did what I was told in the class, it didn't work, I'd go to the student coaching, and just wouldn't be able to get it. Granted, the coaches didn't hand anyone a solution, but they didn't exactly help me either.

In my 3rd quarter, I took the next Java class up. OK, I'm calling these Java classes even though the teachers said "this isn't a Java class," but let's be real: they're ****ing Java classes, for all practical purposes. Sure, the concepts learned within can be applied to multiple languages, but knowledge of Java still would've helped, as I stated. Things seemed to go well for a while, but the road block came with my student grader. She was a girl in my same class (of total students, set to graduate in 2020) who had taken the class the previous quarter. And the problem with her was this: My teacher often set many assignment grades to be hit-or-miss, and so I'd get a 0 on an assignment that I submitted. If you get a 0 before the due date, you get to fix it. My coach/grader often times wouldn't regrade my assignments when I re-submitted them. As a result, many of my grades stayed 0 when they should've been well over 60. It didn't help that not only was I doing poorly in that quarter's math class, I failed the Networking class again. So by the last two weeks of the quarter, I just knew I was going to fail. So I ended up withdrawing from the school, and by extension, moving out of the student-sponsored housing. It was a real pain in the ass, I decided to find a new place to live because moving back across the country to my Dad's house (which won't belong to us anyway in a few months) was neither an appealing option nor one that made sense.

The college was also a sausage fest. There was only about 1 girl for every 20 of us guys there. I legit got no action the entire time I was there, and I hardly even had time for it anyway.

The degree I chose was more business focused, so I want to pursue finance, etc after going to gen eds at community college for two years.

Am I just not cut out for CS stuff, or was I just not taught it well? I understood at least Java half the time, hell, it was even fun sometimes, but really the pacing of the classes was at a mile a minute and overwhelming. That, and the other schools in my area have equally good CS programs and were less expensive than the one I was at. So that begs the question: could I actually do CS/programming? Did I just go to the wrong school? Or should I just cut my losses? People I graduated high school with are going to finish their second year this Spring, and I have de facto nothing - almost none of my gen ed credits from the previous school will transfer, so when I do start school this Spring or Summer it's going to be a fresh start.
I was in your shoes too as an undergrad. I majored in IT and Java was my language too. I remember I used to spend 12 hours a day coding. It took over my life. But I was mainly stuck making simple classes. Things took a turn for the worse when I started learning JavaScript. Because in javascript, there’s like 10 ways you can perform a certain function. It was then that I knew coding wasn’t for me. But luckily I majored in IT and was able to get into networking and cyber security. I eventually graduated and then decided I didn’t want to do anything in IT, lol. I wanted to go into business so I just applied for an MBA program and got accepted. It’s easy to get into business from in IT. Business and IT goes hand in hand and can lead to high paying jobs like project manager.
 

nicksaiz65

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Question for @switch7 and any other programmers in here really...

What do you use for help/tutoring when you get stuck at your actual professional job? As a student, I sometimes feel that I can't make it two steps into this coding stuff without getting hella tutoring/Chegg. It just doesn't work unless I can get another person to look at it and help me work through it. So I've basically given up on programming without using the internet lol.

What's the equivalent of this on the job? Do I just go on Stack Exchange and ask for help?

To make this specific, I had an Assembly Program where I needed to write Selection Sort for an array of strings input through the terminal. I could barely initialize the array, loop through it, and get it to store the strings properly.

My student solution is to get on YouTube/get tutored on Chegg, but what's the professional coding solution if you get absolutely stuck?
 

switch7

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Question for @switch7 and any other programmers in here really...

What do you use for help/tutoring when you get stuck at your actual professional job? As a student, I sometimes feel that I can't make it two steps into this coding stuff without getting hella tutoring/Chegg. It just doesn't work unless I can get another person to look at it and help me work through it. So I've basically given up on programming without using the internet lol.

What's the equivalent of this on the job? Do I just go on Stack Exchange and ask for help?

To make this specific, I had an Assembly Program where I needed to write Selection Sort for an array of strings input through the terminal. I could barely initialize the array, loop through it, and get it to store the strings properly.

My student solution is to get on YouTube/get tutored on Chegg, but what's the professional coding solution if you get absolutely stuck?

I sit next to between my CTO and the system architect, and they spend nearly as much time banging their head against the wall as I do, it comes with the job.

If i'm really stuck on something i'll grab a senior or another dev but not before googling thoroughly and reading docs. My number one go to for solving issues is just reading the docs properly, but this is more for framework and library type stuff i.e using react or .net.

You will always use google, no one can remember everything.

If you are having trouble with the fundamental stuff i.e learning the basic language and doing katas, then that's completely normal when learning. Repetition is key, spend an hour or so doing katas everyday, eventually you won't need to refer to google so much and the problem solving will become more natural.

Even in interview tech tests, you will be told to use google if you need to, so don't sweat, just keep adding the air miles, and use the internet, as much as possible, its a tool not a crutch.
 
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nicksaiz65

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I sit next to between my CTO and the system architect, and they spend nearly as much time banging their head against the wall as I do, it comes with the job.

If i'm really stuck on something i'll grab a senior or another dev but not before googling thoroughly and reading docs. My number one go to for solving issues is just reading the docs properly, but this is more for framework and library type stuff i.e using react or .net.

You will always use google, no one can remember everything.

If you are having trouble with the fundamental stuff i.e learning the basic language and doing katas, then that's completely normal when learning. Repetition is key, spend an hour or so doing katas everyday, eventually you won't need to refer to google so much and the problem solving will become more natural.

Even in interview tech tests, you will be told to use google if you need to, so don't sweat, just keep adding the air miles, and use the internet, as much as possible, its a tool not a crutch.
Sounds good. So in school, I use the internet, tutoring, books, Chegg, and StackExchange.

At work, I use the internet, books, and StackExchange.

I've found that looking at programming problems similar to what I'm trying to accomplish really really helps.

Also, just sitting down at the computer and being like "I will not get up until this problem is completely solved or at least working more than it did before."

I feel like giving myself productivity goals for my school programs would help too. Like "By x day, I need to have y functions implemented." So I'm not flailing around in the wind and just praying that I get it done by the deadline.
 

switch7

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Sounds good. So in school, I use the internet, tutoring, books, Chegg, and StackExchange.

At work, I use the internet, books, and StackExchange.

I've found that looking at programming problems similar to what I'm trying to accomplish really really helps.

Also, just sitting down at the computer and being like "I will not get up until this problem is completely solved or at least working more than it did before."

I feel like giving myself productivity goals for my school programs would help too. Like "By x day, I need to have y functions implemented." So I'm not flailing around in the wind and just praying that I get it done by the deadline.

Are you doing an internship or something? You mentioned working and school? Also what language are you learning?

PS there are far more experienced developers on here than me that can probably give you better advice, i am just a junior ... @marmel75 and @sazc
 

nicksaiz65

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Are you doing an internship or something? You mentioned working and school? Also what language are you learning?

PS there are far more experienced developers on here than me that can probably give you better advice, i am just a junior ... @marmel75 and @sazc
I'm in school. I'm just thinking towards the future when I get employed as a software engineer.

I'm working in MASM... 80x86 Assembly unfortunately
 
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