High Paying Job Drains all my Time

FlirtLife

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Just a side note and I know this isn't the thread for this, but I'd love getting some help from you in regards to how you got your job and if there's any possibility of referrals. It's not everyday I come across a fellow software engineer here on Sosuave haha.
Earlier you said "this isn't the thread for this", and after that every one of your posts is about you. Rather than take over someone else's thread, you could create your own - there's enough interest in both topics.
 

LightIsTaken

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Earlier you said "this isn't the thread for this", and after that every one of your posts is about you. Rather than take over someone else's thread, you could create your own - there's enough interest in both topics.
I'm just answering to the questions that others are asking.
 

BackInTheGame78

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Yea I see what you are saying , Theres a huge difference between working hard and working smart though

there are plenty of ways too make good money without losing 60 hours of your life a week

the biggest issue I see is that too find a way out of the rat race you need time , and the rat race is specifically designed for you to not have any time

This is the main thing I try too explain too people trying to escape the system you need time away from your job to strategise a way out of it
Once you become good at being a software engineer over time you realize that most of the time you can get what they expect 40 hours of work to be done in 20-25 hours. Maybe 30 tops.

I don't think I've actually worked 40 hours in a week in a long time.

I work in spurts where I will be super productive for like 3-4 hours like a coding savant and then I'll take a bunch of time to myself and do other things.

End result is thing still get done at the same pace as they expect if not faster. Have no interest in taking on extra work because I am more efficient than others.

Never punish yourself for working smarter rather than working harder. I did that for a long time and believe me all it does is cause you to become burnt out.

Now, in the event I couldn't get things done in that timeframe, obviously I would work the normal hours to get it done...I simply just haven't had to in a long time. I'm not saying slack off and don't get your job done either...I am saying get what's expected of you done in the time it is expected but when you are able to exceed that time, don't give it back to them.
 

FlexpertHamilton

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You would if you were the sole breadwinner for your family and were taking care of your parents and siblings while knowing that there's NO ONE in your relative bloodline who would be there to lend you a hand because they're living an even poorer life. Add to that the fact that MOST of the jobs in first world countries aren't offered to people in third world countries. Of course I'm doing everything in my power to get to $80k or more, but it's WAY HARDER to achieve when you're trying to do it from a third world country. You have to put double or triple the effort, because the companies in first world countries would rather prefer hiring their native citizens, then outsiders and that's totally understandable.

These issues will sound alien to you, but you can only understand them if you were able to actually live your life as a native citizen of a third world country.


Taking a risk is harder when you have responsibilities on your shoulders. Even more so when those responsibilities are your loved ones. You start walking on eggshells because you're thinking about them, putting their needs first and you'd rather get an immediate $2k month to take care of them, then wait on for an indefinite time till you get to $8k a month.
Oh I misread, I thought you had said you were in the US which is why that was so shocking.
 

logicallefty

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Working long hours at the start of a career to establish yourself is fine. But once you do that then you should pull back with it. If your company expects it for the long haul that’s not sustainable. But you are already established so you can go find other employment, and probably make more too.
 

nicksaiz65

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Once you become good at being a software engineer over time you realize that most of the time you can get what they expect 40 hours of work to be done in 20-25 hours. Maybe 30 tops.

I don't think I've actually worked 40 hours in a week in a long time.

I work in spurts where I will be super productive for like 3-4 hours like a coding savant and then I'll take a bunch of time to myself and do other things.

End result is thing still get done at the same pace as they expect if not faster. Have no interest in taking on extra work because I am more efficient than others.

Never punish yourself for working smarter rather than working harder. I did that for a long time and believe me all it does is cause you to become burnt out.

Now, in the event I couldn't get things done in that timeframe, obviously I would work the normal hours to get it done...I simply just haven't had to in a long time. I'm not saying slack off and don't get your job done either...I am saying get what's expected of you done in the time it is expected but when you are able to exceed that time, don't give it back to them.
I'm not at this point yet.. I just need more time and experience coding but I'm sure I'll get to that point eventually.

I agree with all of your statements. I think that once I get to the point you're at, that's when OverEmployed becomes a real possibility.

I could do it before then, but that would require more of a time investment on my part. And my current job is not OE-friendly, so for the time I'm ok with being where I'm at and just increasing my skills over time.
 

nicksaiz65

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Working long hours at the start of a career to establish yourself is fine. But once you do that then you should pull back with it. If your company expects it for the long haul that’s not sustainable. But you are already established so you can go find other employment, and probably make more too.
This
 

nicksaiz65

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One really important thing that I failed to mention is that it's really important that I'm working effectively and not just working hard. As in, focused work.

I was having a bit of trouble the last couple of days focusing, and that set me back. I had to take a weekend day to get back on track, and that's exactly the issue that I was talking about in this thread.

Things that Help with Focus(some of these could be obvious):
- Caffeine
- Not working with background noise like the TV or YouTube in the background. Use Spotify
- Not checking my phone every 10 mins
- Being as well rested as possible
 

BillyPilgrim

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Things that Help with Focus(some of these could be obvious):
- Caffeine
- Not working with background noise like the TV or YouTube in the background. Use Spotify
- Not checking my phone every 10 mins
- Being as well rested as possible
#1 and #4 don't play well together lol. Use ginseng and caffeine substitutes as much as you can
 

Mike32ct

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- Not working with background noise like the TV or YouTube in the background. Use Spotify
I’ve gone back and forth on this while working from home. On one hand, having some music or a good podcast going certainly makes work more pleasant. But I do notice that it slows me down somewhat on what I’m working on. In other words, it ties up at least some of my mental resources. I might have to go back to working in total quiet all day.
 

nicksaiz65

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I’ve gone back and forth on this while working from home. On one hand, having some music or a good podcast going certainly makes work more pleasant. But I do notice that it slows me down somewhat on what I’m working on. In other words, it ties up at least some of my mental resources. I might have to go back to working in total quiet all day.
I can get lots done with the music, but not the videos/podcasts in the background. I burned nearly a whole day last week with the videos.

I end up getting annoyed with my work and then just watching the video lol.
 

FlirtLife

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You currently earn $120,000/year [1] as a contractor [2]. Glassdoor claims that entry-level software engineering jobs pay $106,000/year on average. Between bonuses, retirement contribution matching, and full dental/health benefits I wonder if you're actually making that much more as a contractor. How much would you expect to earn as a full-time employee?

[1]
I’ve told this story over and over, but I’m a software engineer, and I recently got a new job that pays me $120,000 per year. This is definitely helping me reach my financial goals.
[2]
I need to make sure that I do very good work and get my contract renewed so that I can continue to direct this income towards my goals. Contract ends July 1 but it seems very likely that it will be renewed,
 

nicksaiz65

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I’ve gone back and forth on this while working from home. On one hand, having some music or a good podcast going certainly makes work more pleasant. But I do notice that it slows me down somewhat on what I’m working on. In other words, it ties up at least some of my mental resources. I might have to go back to working in total quiet all day.
Well... I say that, but I'm listening to a Podcast as I currently work haha.

It really does make work like 10x more enjoyable and it's stopping me from burning out.
 

nicksaiz65

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You currently earn $120,000/year [1] as a contractor [2]. Glassdoor claims that entry-level software engineering jobs pay $106,000/year on average. Between bonuses, retirement contribution matching, and full dental/health benefits I wonder if you're actually making that much more as a contractor. How much would you expect to earn as a full-time employee?

[1]


[2]
Well technically, I should be more specific and say I'm doing government contracting(for the army.) I think this is about as much as I would make, and I still work a "standard" 40-hour workweek. This is a significant jump from my last job, where I was making around $75,000/year.
 

Mike32ct

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Well... I say that, but I'm listening to a Podcast as I currently work haha.

It really does make work like 10x more enjoyable and it's stopping me from burning out.
Same here. Agree. I’m writing a report and listening to a podcast now lol. Music eventually tires me. Interesting pods don’t.
 

SW15

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Well technically, I should be more specific and say I'm doing government contracting(for the army.) I think this is about as much as I would make, and I still work a "standard" 40-hour workweek. This is a significant jump from my last job, where I was making around $75,000/year.
Going from a salary of $75,000 per year to $120,000 per year is impressive. There are more expectations and more demands when you earn so much more.
 

nicksaiz65

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Same here. Agree. I’m writing a report and listening to a podcast now lol. Music eventually tires me. Interesting pods don’t.
Nice, what podcasts do you like?

I wouldn't go as far to listen to audiobooks while working, but I think that anything that lets you work more is a very good thing. I need the music and podcasts to keep going haha.

What kind of podcasts do you like?
 

nicksaiz65

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Going from a salary of $75,000 per year to $120,000 per year is impressive. There are more expectations and more demands when you earn so much more.
Thank you man. My initial salary was actually $68.5K. All that studying has paid off.
 
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