High Paying Job Drains all my Time

BackInTheGame78

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As for the bad code part, I can't comment on that yet because I'm too new to the company. I'm just coming up on 2 months. I do agree with you on the bad code though.

One thing I really enjoy about this company so far, is that every time I try to upload a merge request, my code absolutely has to pass the pipeline or it won't even get through. Kind of a safeguard against me uploading crappy code that breaks everything. I'm wondering if that is standard practice everywhere? We didn't do that at my last company.

Yes, we use point based systems. 1, 3, 5, 8. I've had that experience as well. I agree that this is a flaw with the deadline system that tasks can become more complex than they originally seemed. People have moved things into the next sprint, but from what I've seen it looks to be a bit frowned on. We have a "code cutoff" as well so that there is time for all of the merge conflicts to be resolved.

I still do prefer this system to my old company, because it was kind of like a wild west with how much was expected of me. I do enjoy the clarity here, I just need to give myself plenty of time to finish my work.
Yeah we have continuous build/deploy pipelines on azure as well and they have to pass unit tests...

Ideally you should run the tests locally before you push up the code and/or create new unit tests for new code being written so you will know if it should pass before being pushed up, but that is definitely a fail safe...although it can create interesting situations when a unit test passes locally but fails on the build server...there have been some interesting findings on that for us :lol:

Yeah I figured on the points thing. We did that at my last company and they were hardcore into agile, even going so far as to hire agile consultants that came in and we all had to take 3 days all day trainings with them to learn how to do it properly...
I'm also a software engineer (more on the JavaScript, React side), but I'm only making around $24k a year. But of course, that means I don't have as much work as you do right now. I'm not sure if it's just us being programmers and coding while sitting in front of a laptop, but I find it difficult to push myself to go out and socialize.

Sure, in your case, since you're making significantly more than me, I'd say it's understandable you've got more responsibility at work, but is it possible there's a part of you that doesn't feel enough excited or interested in going out even when you don't have too much work?

Just a side note and I know this isn't the thread for this, but I'd love getting some help from you in regards to how you got your job and if there's any possibility of referrals. It's not everyday I come across a fellow software engineer here on Sosuave haha.
24K a year? This can't be in the US...
 

DreamAgain

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What do you value more time or money ?

For me time to do as I please with my days is far more important than money

Money is just paper and numbers endlessly created and printed by banks , your time and overall life is finite

125K a year isnt even life changing money you cant really do anything with it other than prepare for retirement which I may add is not gauranteed

the best years of your life are obviously going to be 20-50 when you are fit healthy , most attractive and sexually active

After that absolutley nothing is guaranteed so the notion of "retirement at 60" to me is highly highly flawed

I would rather take my chances being broke at 60+ and enjoying my life to the max now than being time poor in my prime not being able to do anything other than work all the time

fvck that
This all changes if you have a wife and family to support. Suddenly money becomes a lot, lot more important, especially if health complications arise.
 

LightIsTaken

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24K a year? This can't be in the US...
You got that right. Its what you get if you're living in a third world country. And mind you, the mean salary for a 1-2 year experienced software engineer in my country is actually $6k - $7k ANNUALLY. The reason I'm making $24k annually is because the company I'm working for, is based in Canada and they're clever to hire cheaper employees remotely from my country. I was just lucky to get this job.
 

BackInTheGame78

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You got that right. Its what you get if you're living in a third world country. And mind you, the mean salary for a 1-2 year experienced software engineer in my country is actually $6k - $7k ANNUALLY. The reason I'm making $24k annually is because the company I'm working for, is based in Canada and they're clever to hire cheaper employees remotely from my country. I was just lucky to get this job.
Man that's ridiculous...24K is less than someone would make flipping burgers in the US at a fast food restaurant working part time 30 hours a week.
 

LightIsTaken

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Man that's ridiculous...24K is less than someone would make flipping burgers in the US at a fast food restaurant working part time 30 hours a week.
Yeah I know. It is what it is. I'm dealt with a bad set of cards and I have to figure out how to still enter the $100k+ game.
 

Bingo-Player

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This all changes if you have a wife and family to support. Suddenly money becomes a lot, lot more important, especially if health complications arise.
A lot of men on this forum are are struggling to get first and second dates as it is

If your working 60 hours + a week I wouldn't really be worrying about a wife and kids you have much bigger issues
 

nicksaiz65

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A lot of men on this forum are are struggling to get first and second dates as it is

If your working 60 hours + a week I wouldn't really be worrying about a wife and kids you have much bigger issues
I recognize that to make money, one needs to grind. Especially in tech.

But how do you eventually break the cycle? Is that just life?
 

DreamAgain

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A lot of men on this forum are are struggling to get first and second dates as it is

If your working 60 hours + a week I wouldn't really be worrying about a wife and kids you have much bigger issues
I agree, just pointing out why grinding is important. Where your kids go to school, your zip code, the neighborhood of your house, are all critically important.
 

nicksaiz65

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move into middle management.
I hear management is a lot of work too, maybe @BackInTheGame78 can speak on that, I remember him making a post on it.

Im wondering if much can be done. Probably best to not look for magic bullets. It can be argued that you can still have time for yourself doing 60-70 hours as long as your time management is great.
 

nicksaiz65

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Yeah we have continuous build/deploy pipelines on azure as well and they have to pass unit tests...

Ideally you should run the tests locally before you push up the code and/or create new unit tests for new code being written so you will know if it should pass before being pushed up, but that is definitely a fail safe...although it can create interesting situations when a unit test passes locally but fails on the build server...there have been some interesting findings on that for us :lol:

Yeah I figured on the points thing. We did that at my last company and they were hardcore into agile, even going so far as to hire agile consultants that came in and we all had to take 3 days all day trainings with them to learn how to do it properly...


24K a year? This can't be in the US...
If there’s one thing I’ve learned, it’s that companies love Agile haha.
 

BaronOfHair

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Shoutout to @BPH for pointing out this issue. It’s finally happening, and I needed to make a thread to see if there is anything I could do.

I’ve told this story over and over, but I’m a software engineer, and I recently got a new job that pays me $120,000 per year. This is definitely helping me reach my financial goals.

The issue is, this job drains all of my time away. It’s programming, and they want their work done lightning quick. So I often have to bring my work home with me so I can stay caught up. On top of that, I have to study the tech stack that the job uses in my personal time. After all of this, the job is eating up a significant portion of my time. I barely have any time left over for me.

At this point, going out say once a week, MAYBE twice a week(that’s really pushing it) is realistic. I’m feeling the situation of golden handcuffs here. I need this job to pay the bills, but it takes so much of my time. I feel like I have none left over, for anything really.

I had to cancel a date to stay caught up on my work today. I know it’s the right choice because I need the IT job to stay financially stable, but it’s annoying how it drains so much of my time.

I needed to get some thoughts on this and see how I could handle it over the short term, as in this year. Do I just live with going out like 1x per week or so? Wanted to open this topic up and get some thoughts.

SPOILER ALERT:
I’m thinking the answer is to work several evenings to get ahead of their deadlines, and don’t even waste a single second so that I still have time to do what I want.
Do you enjoy your current gig/find it fulfilling, or is the paycheck pretty much your only reason for staying there?
 

nicksaiz65

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Do you enjoy your current gig/find it fulfilling, or is the paycheck pretty much your only reason for staying there?
I mean, I really can’t complain. I work remote and I make over 6 figs, so I’ve got it pretty good
 

Bingo-Player

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I agree, just pointing out why grinding is important. Where your kids go to school, your zip code, the neighborhood of your house, are all critically important.
Yea I see what you are saying , Theres a huge difference between working hard and working smart though

there are plenty of ways too make good money without losing 60 hours of your life a week

the biggest issue I see is that too find a way out of the rat race you need time , and the rat race is specifically designed for you to not have any time

This is the main thing I try too explain too people trying to escape the system you need time away from your job to strategise a way out of it
 

AmsterdamAssassin

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Go into consultancy, work your own hours.
 

FlirtLife

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move into middle management.
In most jobs, management is a significant bump in salary. Software engineer salaries overlap (and may exceed) manager salaries, so this advice might not apply to OP.
 

FlirtLife

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I need to make sure that I do very good work and get my contract renewed so that I can continue to direct this income towards my goals. Contract ends July 1 but it seems very likely that it will be renewed, it was even stated that there was lots of work to do and more people were needed, especially on the E2E Testing(which I have been moved to.)
I recognize that to make money, one needs to grind. Especially in tech.

But how do you eventually break the cycle? Is that just life?
I went the full-time employment route, so I'm less familiar with the struggles of contract workers. Impressing your co-workers will help get your contract renewed, and you will also have more people to use as referrals when you try to get contracts in the future. At every company I worked, I knew someone who worked there before. I imagine that is even more valuable for a contractor who needs to find new companies.

It has been my experience that the first months at a new company are more of a grind. In your situation, with everyone having 3-6 years more experience, you might always feel like you're trying to catch up. There's a balance between being stressed enough to perform well for new co-workers, and burning yourself out with constant stress over catching up. I hope you find the balance between those two.
 
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FlexpertHamilton

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You got that right. Its what you get if you're living in a third world country. And mind you, the mean salary for a 1-2 year experienced software engineer in my country is actually $6k - $7k ANNUALLY. The reason I'm making $24k annually is because the company I'm working for, is based in Canada and they're clever to hire cheaper employees remotely from my country. I was just lucky to get this job.
Yeah I know. It is what it is. I'm dealt with a bad set of cards and I have to figure out how to still enter the $100k+ game.
???

The gall of a company to pay highly skilled workers less than fast food/retail employees... People like you are letting them get away with it.

Why do you think you're lucky to get this job? I would never take a software engineering job that paid less than $60k...Even entry level should pay $50k minimum. That's absolutely absurd.

If you want to enter the 100k game, work multiple WFH software jobs and fvck them all around endlessly in a rotation, getting new jobs if/when you get fired. Companies do not deserve your respect, loyalty, gratitude, or dedication, you are nothing to them.
 

nicksaiz65

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???

The gall of a company to pay highly skilled workers less than fast food/retail employees... People like you are letting them get away with it.

Why do you think you're lucky to get this job? I would never take a software engineering job that paid less than $60k...Even entry level should pay $50k minimum. That's absolutely absurd.

If you want to enter the 100k game, work multiple WFH software jobs and fvck them all around endlessly in a rotation, getting new jobs if/when you get fired. Companies do not deserve your respect, loyalty, gratitude, or dedication, you are nothing to them.
If/when I leave my current job, I aim to work a non government/DOD job. That way, I could give Overemployed a try and increase my salary further.

At the moment, I think I need to stay put. I’m having a bit of trouble beating that $120K with 2 YOE.
 

LightIsTaken

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I would never take a software engineering job that paid less than $60k...Even entry level should pay $50k minimum. That's absolutely absurd.
You would if you were the sole breadwinner for your family and were taking care of your parents and siblings while knowing that there's NO ONE in your relative bloodline who would be there to lend you a hand because they're living an even poorer life. Add to that the fact that MOST of the jobs in first world countries aren't offered to people in third world countries. Of course I'm doing everything in my power to get to $80k or more, but it's WAY HARDER to achieve when you're trying to do it from a third world country. You have to put double or triple the effort, because the companies in first world countries would rather prefer hiring their native citizens, then outsiders and that's totally understandable.

These issues will sound alien to you, but you can only understand them if you were able to actually live your life as a native citizen of a third world country.


Taking a risk is harder when you have responsibilities on your shoulders. Even more so when those responsibilities are your loved ones. You start walking on eggshells because you're thinking about them, putting their needs first and you'd rather get an immediate $2k month to take care of them, then wait on for an indefinite time till you get to $8k a month.
 
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