Emotional eating weight gain

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Master Don Juan
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It's a good start. Noom teaches you how to eat properly via nutrient dense foods with high water content.

I'd recommend adding walking 30 minutes a day upping it to 60 minutes a day at least 4-5x a week. Doesn't need to all be done at the same time, if you need to break it up into 3 or 4 shorter periods during the day that's fine.

That will help turbocharge your results. Walking is super effective for fat loss, especially when done consistently over time.
I'm not going to say "don't walk", but if you make 30-60 minutes walking 4-5x a week your baseline caloric expenditure - when you hit a weight loss "wall", you have to either further decrease calories or increase cardio. Having a baseline that high can turn this into 60-90 minutes 6-7x a week, if not more.

Speaking from the perspective of someone with little time to train and trying to get sub-10% BF. This advice may not apply if only seeking say 15%BF. Things tend not to get too crazy in that range.
 

CAPSLOCK BANDIT

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You don't have a food problem, you have a dopamine problem, food is just the vehicle that gets you to the high, the high being that dopamine hit, yet every time after the first we go seeking that hit, the brain naturally reduces it so we don't get stuck in a feedback loop, so if your dopamine vehicle is food, you have to consume more and more food to get where you want to be and there are limits, either physical or mental, like my brother used to just eat--purge--eat again because the pursuit for the dopamine got so intense for him.

The problem is when you want to stop, you can stop eating, fast for a week, your appetite will reduce dramatically, yet the want for that dopamine hit won't, it'll just be a gaping hole of discomfort on your psyche. You are literally a drug addict, the only difference is your drug is food.

You have much higher issues than just food, resolve those first, the fact that your in a majority of people within this country at that size is truly terrifying, you don't have the healthcare infrastructure to care for all these people down the line and the people doing it are making trillions so they'll never stop.

However, is it surprising? No, not at all because the dopamine chase is what fueled survival in us for millions of years, some people are just wired to chase it, back then those same people would of been apex human beings because there was no feedback loop to get caught up in.

Truly, the vast majority of the world is caught up in a psychological dopamine feedback loop in some way or another, here we chase after tail, same thing, same dopamine hit just a different vehicle.

This is the point of adopting a purpose in your life, to have a vision beyond the dopamine hit so you can simply look at it for what it is, as opposed to something that should be chased after fruitlessly.
 

BackInTheGame78

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I'm not going to say "don't walk", but if you make 30-60 minutes walking 4-5x a week your baseline caloric expenditure - when you hit a weight loss "wall", you have to either further decrease calories or increase cardio. Having a baseline that high can turn this into 60-90 minutes 6-7x a week, if not more.

Speaking from the perspective of someone with little time to train and trying to get sub-10% BF. This advice may not apply if only seeking say 15%BF. Things tend not to get too crazy in that range.
Whenever I hit a weight loss wall the answer for me is to up my caloric intake.

It's happened over and over again to the point of if I am stuck for 2 weeks within a certain 3-4 lb range, I increase my caloric intake by 300-500 calories and miraculously start losing weight again.

For him, being at around 40% bodyfat currently he shouldn't even be concerned about how he could get to 10%. He should be concerned about how to get to 30% and then 20%. That's going to take some major effort in and of itself.

It's far better for him to improve his results during this time to increase the likelihood he will continue on this path than do less so it's easier for him to drop an additional 5% BF at 15%. Which I am not sure if that would even be true as there is a metabolic cost associated with G-Flux that usually isn't taken into account but is a real thing.

Point in case, sit around for a month doing nothing and give yourself a 500 calorie deficit versus being active in a 500 calorie deficit for a month and on balance you will be far better off in pretty much every way...from a weight, LBM and fat mass perspective by doing more versus doing less even with the same caloric deficit. Because at the end of the day, calories are only a part of the puzzle, not the entire puzzle that many think they are.

Walking is exceptional in that it is a low intensity form of exercise that utilizes almost all fat via the oxidative system versus more intense forms of cardio that are fueled via glycogen.

And as with anything in the body, the more the body does something regularly, the better it gets at it...so in this case, the body becomes much better at burning fat regularly even outside of the time you would be walking due to upregulating it's lipolysis machinery since it's at work so often.
 
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obelisk

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I fell off the wagon and ate a whole freaking pizza last night at 10PM. Felt like complete crap all day. Back on the wagon again.
 

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I fell off the wagon and ate a whole freaking pizza last night at 10PM. Felt like complete crap all day. Back on the wagon again.
It happens. Just don't let one bad day turn into two or three or a week. Accept it for what it is and get back at it.
 

CAPSLOCK BANDIT

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I fell off the wagon and ate a whole freaking pizza last night at 10PM. Felt like complete crap all day. Back on the wagon again.
You need to cheat or else you will just fall off the wagon and not get back on, it's just rewiring yourself through discipline to have a cheat that's desirable but still somewhat healthy, I mean pizza is fat and carbs so it's especially bad unless it's fueling a big work out, but you also need about 1/4 of your body weight a day in fat to aid in test production which could be made to be about a pizza, then it's just the carbs and the work out.

Its just the type of fat you want that can make the pizza undesirable, so you gotta vet the ingredients of each place to find what's ideal for your diet
 

BackInTheGame78

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You need to cheat or else you will just fall off the wagon and not get back on, it's just rewiring yourself through discipline to have a cheat that's desirable but still somewhat healthy, I mean pizza is fat and carbs so it's especially bad unless it's fueling a big work out, but you also need about 1/4 of your body weight a day in fat to aid in test production which could be made to be about a pizza, then it's just the carbs and the work out.

Its just the type of fat you want that can make the pizza undesirable, so you gotta vet the ingredients of each place to find what's ideal for your diet
The key if you are going to cheat is to make it all in a single day. If you are on point the rest of the week leading up to it your body will have down regulated it's ability to store fat efficiently and it will be of minimal harm. Also it is wise to put your heaviest lifting day on it as well, which should be legs.

To put it in perspective, I used to have cheat days once a week where I'd probably eat 7000-10000 calories. I'm talking everything. Ice cream fo breakfast, huge taco bell order at lunch, pizza etc...no limits.

Then I'd follow it with a fast day. Net effect over those two days would be zero in terms of weight(+3 lbs after cheat day, -3 lbs after fasting day) but it would then fuel weight loss the rest of the week since leptin would be reset and thryoid would be revved.

End result, lost 25-30 lbs in 6 weeks, with most coming within the first 4. I did this multiple times over the years.

If your diet is on point normally cheat day will have virtually no effect as long as it's one day.
 

Pierce Manhammer

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End result, lost 25-30 lbs in 6 weeks, with most coming within the first 4. I did this multiple times over the years.
Thats impressive as f* - at what age?

If your diet is on point normally cheat day will have virtually no effect as long as it's one day.
I've found this to be true as long as you are, as said above ON POINT, the rest of the week.
 

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Thats impressive as f* - at what age?

I've found this to be true as long as you are, as said above ON POINT, the rest of the week.
That was from late 30s to early 40s. Did the same thing every winter starting in early February.

Yes...there are some people I read on here who claim their diet is "on point" but it is really a lot closer to 60% on point than 100% on point with some of the food choices I SMH at.
 

deadmasterx

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I'm trying to curb my emotional eating but it's really difficult.

I thought there supposed to be food shortgages coming in the new year, so I bought a bunch of crackers and what not. Nothing happened yet, and some events at home precipated me to start eating this food and now I'm over 40% bf. Healthy chips, crackers (whole wheat) and arrowroot buiscuits.

Planning to see a doctor next week but don't want to disclose too much information as to the emotional triggers to eating this type of foods, etc...

Has anyone have this problem before? How did you deal with emotional eating?
Yeah, I've been and still am there, especially lately. I moved to another country two years ago, better economy, more money in my pocket, living alone and with less time to cook. The perfect environment for me to just buy junk food. I'm not sure how heavy I was when I got there, but I'm almost 140kg now. Being fat sucks, but it sucks even harder to keep on stress eating, as if your only way to deal with the stress or frustration is eating ****ty food.

Well, I recently (this week, to be more precise) started something called the "Warrior's Diet". As stupid as the name sounds, it was recommended by an well-known brazilian oldschool fitness coach, who said it helps with your metabolic syndrome (because it keeps the insuline levels low for the most part of the day, avoiding constant peaks that eventually results in insuline resistance). For me, it's not a problem to stay the whole day long fasting and only eat when I get home (by 6pm, sometimes later).

Anyways, food struggle sucks and it's real, we gotta keep careful with that. Time goes by, we barely look ourselves in the mirror, and before you notice, your belly is so big that's rolling over your c*** and giving you a hard time wiping your as* after you take a sh*t.
 

corrector

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Yeah, I've been and still am there, especially lately. I moved to another country two years ago, better economy, more money in my pocket, living alone and with less time to cook. The perfect environment for me to just buy junk food. I'm not sure how heavy I was when I got there, but I'm almost 140kg now. Being fat sucks, but it sucks even harder to keep on stress eating, as if your only way to deal with the stress or frustration is eating ****ty food.

Well, I recently (this week, to be more precise) started something called the "Warrior's Diet". As stupid as the name sounds, it was recommended by an well-known brazilian oldschool fitness coach, who said it helps with your metabolic syndrome (because it keeps the insuline levels low for the most part of the day, avoiding constant peaks that eventually results in insuline resistance). For me, it's not a problem to stay the whole day long fasting and only eat when I get home (by 6pm, sometimes later).

Anyways, food struggle sucks and it's real, we gotta keep careful with that. Time goes by, we barely look ourselves in the mirror, and before you notice, your belly is so big that's rolling over your c*** and giving you a hard time wiping your as* after you take a sh*t.
How tall are you? I'm, 5'10, about 188 kg, and as weighed today, at 39.5% body fat. I'm using the Noom diet app plus some exercise here and there. I wouldn't say my belly is that big and I'm able to buckle two notches in if I'm standing up (before I was only able to do one). There is some "right direction" improvement with me, but still a long way to go to close the gap. Noom's dieting focuses on the caloric density of foods and puts them in three categories, green (having the least caloric density and recommended), yellow (in between), and orange (having the most caloric density foods, and only "healthy" types of foods here might be recommended).

The Warrior's Diet sounds interesting, however, my bad cholesterol levels are unfortunately elevated (but still borderline territory rather than "freak-out" type of high) and I have to limit egg consumption.
 

deadmasterx

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How tall are you? I'm, 5'10, about 188 kg, and as weighed today, at 39.5% body fat. I'm using the Noom diet app plus some exercise here and there. I wouldn't say my belly is that big and I'm able to buckle two notches in if I'm standing up (before I was only able to do one). There is some "right direction" improvement with me, but still a long way to go to close the gap. Noom's dieting focuses on the caloric density of foods and puts them in three categories, green (having the least caloric density and recommended), yellow (in between), and orange (having the most caloric density foods, and only "healthy" types of foods here might be recommended).

The Warrior's Diet sounds interesting, however, my bad cholesterol levels are unfortunately elevated (but still borderline territory rather than "freak-out" type of high) and I have to limit egg consumption.
I'm 1.92m. I'm not sure what my body fat % is, as I still have some muscle (way less that I used to have, tho) under the thick fat layer, but I believe I must be around 35-40%. Being tall and heavy like that is especially hard, because your blood pressure is higher and your knee will suffer if you try to do any high intensity cardio, so diet and working out with some light and moderate cardio are my only options. Also been struggling to be consistent at gym, despite feeling really good there.

About the diet, it's very simple. You fast the whole day long and eat at night. The coach recommends a 4 to 6 hour window for you to be eating all your calories, not needing to worry much about the quality of the foods. As long as your respecting your protein and fat intake, don't worry about the rest. For me it works out fine because when I was younger, I used to eat large meals 3 times a day, and because of that I need big meals to feel full and nice. I couldn't possibly be eating a plate of leaves and then 100g of rice with 80g of meat. It just isn't enough. I'm not so much into eating leaves, for me rice and chicken is enough, maybe that also helps. Basically, all you need to do is fast the whole day long, eat your calories at night. He also says that working out before, during or after your meal time doesn't make much of a difference, which is also a good point for me.
 

BackInTheGame78

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How tall are you? I'm, 5'10, about 188 kg, and as weighed today, at 39.5% body fat. I'm using the Noom diet app plus some exercise here and there. I wouldn't say my belly is that big and I'm able to buckle two notches in if I'm standing up (before I was only able to do one). There is some "right direction" improvement with me, but still a long way to go to close the gap. Noom's dieting focuses on the caloric density of foods and puts them in three categories, green (having the least caloric density and recommended), yellow (in between), and orange (having the most caloric density foods, and only "healthy" types of foods here might be recommended).

The Warrior's Diet sounds interesting, however, my bad cholesterol levels are unfortunately elevated (but still borderline territory rather than "freak-out" type of high) and I have to limit egg consumption.
Your cholesterol numbers have NOTHING to do with egg consumption. Another nonsensical myth that's been disproven time and time again yet somehow is still quoted like a Bible by doctors and people alike.
 

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I'm 1.92m. I'm not sure what my body fat % is, as I still have some muscle (way less that I used to have, tho) under the thick fat layer, but I believe I must be around 35-40%. Being tall and heavy like that is especially hard, because your blood pressure is higher and your knee will suffer if you try to do any high intensity cardio, so diet and working out with some light and moderate cardio are my only options. Also been struggling to be consistent at gym, despite feeling really good there.

About the diet, it's very simple. You fast the whole day long and eat at night. The coach recommends a 4 to 6 hour window for you to be eating all your calories, not needing to worry much about the quality of the foods. As long as your respecting your protein and fat intake, don't worry about the rest. For me it works out fine because when I was younger, I used to eat large meals 3 times a day, and because of that I need big meals to feel full and nice. I couldn't possibly be eating a plate of leaves and then 100g of rice with 80g of meat. It just isn't enough. I'm not so much into eating leaves, for me rice and chicken is enough, maybe that also helps. Basically, all you need to do is fast the whole day long, eat your calories at night. He also says that working out before, during or after your meal time doesn't make much of a difference, which is also a good point for me.
The only cardio that's ever needed by anyone is walking and anyone who is ambulatory should be able to do that.
 

Blacksheep

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The first thing is to identify what is causing emotional eating. And this is a bit hard, but possible.

Bupropion helped me in some way since I went no contact with my parents and started my life over, but I still had binge eating.

Ive lost 20kg so far. Had lost more but I gained 7kg since my last relationship. Working on losing it again.

When you identify the triggers, you have to work on your guilt. We use to blame ourselves and feel guilty when overeat. This is not good also. Be kind and work on a mindset of slowly improving.

Get enough sleep. This is the key to regulate your hunger and give you more energy and willpower. Without that, you can become more depressed, anxious and then... overeat.

Dont push too hard on gym or workouts at this time, since it can make you moe hunger too. Do some walkings, pushups and thats it.

There is some kind of foods that creates inflamation and make you hunger. Like refined carbs, sugar, gluten foods. Its a good thing to avoid it. But I know this is a bit difficult, so go slowly.

I would say relationships are the main cause. It can be family, friends, girls, work... thats why I told you to check on that.

And put your sleep in priority. This is making a huge difference in my life.
 

Blacksheep

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But are crackers really shvt food? Its not great food, but I thought shvt food is more like french fries, soda pop, oreo cookies, poutine, cheesecake, as opposed to crackers and biscuits (ie especially where Arrowroot flour is low glycemic). You can also have high-quality Keto foods that have no sugar in the ingredients and promote healthy fats, but then has like 100g of fat/saturated fat if it's a dessert (ie like a Keto-cheesecake or Keto-cupcake). They are expensive too and even diebetics can eat them! But even if you are healthy morbidly obese, (ie you have fat, but no indicators of chronic disease and everything else is 100% totally healthy), you can't argue that 40% + of healthy fat is good even if there is no shvt food.
A lot of carbs in small amounts. Better to eat rice instead (still high in carbs but way less than those stuffs).

And it doesnt fill your hunger. Thats why eating natural foods like meat, vegetables, eggs is way better.
 

EyeBRollin

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Your cholesterol numbers have NOTHING to do with egg consumption. Another nonsensical myth that's been disproven time and time again yet somehow is still quoted like a Bible by doctors and people alike.
This is not accurate. Telling someone with borderline high cholesterol to disregard their egg consumption is like telling someone with emphysema to disregard cigarette use.

Eggs do affect cholesterol and should be titrated based on individual variability. As with most nutrients, it is a dose dependent S curve. Some individuals can consume 10 eggs per day and it will have no effect. Usually those are folks already consuming a high amount of animal-based foods that already have a suboptimal lipid panel. Some individuals eggs will have a drastic effect. Try running an egg study on vegans and watch what happens to their cholesterol levels.
 
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BackInTheGame78

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This is not accurate. Telling someone with borderline high cholesterol to disregard their egg consumption is like telling someone with emphysema to disregard cigarette use.

Eggs do affect cholesterol and should be titrated based on individual variability. As with most nutrients, it is a dose dependent S curve. Some individuals can consume 10 eggs per day and it will have no effect. Usually those are folks already consuming a high amount of animal-based foods that already have a suboptimal lipid panel. Some individuals eggs will have a drastic effect. Try running an egg study on vegans and watch what happens to their cholesterol levels.

Here is where it all falls apart for you and your cholesterol holy Grail...

That and your liver can produce 10x or more the amount of cholesterol you could ever eat in a day anytime it wants to.

"the authors concluded that there is no evidence that eggs play a role in the development of CVD."

 

EyeBRollin

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Here is where it all falls apart for you and your cholesterol holy Grail...

That and your liver can produce 10x or more the amount of cholesterol you could ever eat in a day anytime it wants to

The contribution from your liver is about

"the authors concluded that there is no evidence that eggs play a role in the development of CVD."

Eggs = heart disease is not my argument. The advisement of a person with high cholesterol to ignore egg consumption is irresponsible. Whole dietary pattern actually accounts for 20-30% of serum cholesterol, with some variability in both directions.

If you aren’t familiar with an S curve relationship, it means that there is a relationship to a certain point, then past that point there is no longer a relationship. In the context of a standard American diet already high in bad fat, bad carbs, and high meat consumption, eggs are neutral. Most people on SAD will observe either modest or no change in lipids from eggs. But as I will repeat, try going vegan for a couple months, then eat 6 eggs a day, and tell us eggs have no effect on lipids. Lol.
 

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Eggs = heart disease is not my argument. The advisement of a person with high cholesterol to ignore egg consumption is irresponsible. Whole dietary pattern actually accounts for 20-30% of serum cholesterol, with some variability in both directions.

If you aren’t familiar with an S curve relationship, it means that there is a relationship to a certain point, then past that point there is no longer a relationship. In the context of a standard American diet already high in bad fat, bad carbs, and high meat consumption, eggs are neutral. Most people on SAD will observe either modest or no change in lipids from eggs. But as I will repeat, try going vegan for a couple months, then eat 6 eggs a day, and tell us eggs have no effect on lipids. Lol.
The fact we are talking about eggs as the problem instead of the fact this man is at 38% Bodyfat and likely has been eating processed crap for 90% of his diet for years and years that has caused this issue is actually mind blowing to me.
 
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