I was correct

Millard Fillmore

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While Wikipedia is a shyte source these days for verifying information as it is heavily biased and full of lies it cannot totally hide the truth:
View attachment 11084
He was indeed Vice President of Pfizer back then.
But obviously he has fallen beyond grace as he didn't follow suite and does not support his former bosses agendas/narratives for whatever reasons he himself and they may have.
Worked at Pfizer. Next.
 

AureliusMaximus

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COVID-19 vaccines cause heart inflammation, U.S. authorities/CDC now acknowledge, although they did try to hide and bury it for a long time.
So there you have it black and white on paper from the US government itself.

More about this can also be found here:
 

AureliusMaximus

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I don't trust what they say dude. Why start now.
You dont need too.

The proof is out there and been for a very long time. Here is some examples and you can find thousands more yourself of them if you do a search on the internet. Use Duckduckgo which is not censored search results which Google search is:

Young athletes speak up about risk of sudden cardiac arrest:

A Jaw-Dropping 769 Athletes Have Collapsed While Competing Over The Past Year:

Frontline Flash™ Daily Dose: ‘ATHLETES DROPPING DEAD’ with Dr. Peterson Pierre:

Maybe governments will stop vaccination program if rich athletes continue to drop dead like flies:

Vax, drop, and flop, sports edition; athletes dropping like flies:

The CDC reports are just finally confirming what we known for a long time.. That the Covid-19 do create these lethal issues to the body.
 
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Pierce Manhammer

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Belief in misinformation about key health issues persists among a good chunk of adults, with false claims about COVID-19, vaccines and reproductive health garnering a substantial amount of support, a poll released Tuesday by KFF has found.

Whether or not they believed the claims, nearly all participants in the survey were aware of the misinformation, with 96 percent saying they had heard at least one of the 10 claims presented to them. The most widespread misinformation claims had to do with COVID-19 and vaccines.

The new polling data found that a third of adults believed the COVID-19 vaccines “caused thousands of sudden deaths in otherwise healthy people,” with 10 percent believing that claim to be “definitely true” and 23 percent saying it was “probably true.” Another 34 percent said it was “probably false,” and 31 percent said that claim was “definitely false.”

Nearly a third of people also said they believed the parasitic deworming medication ivermectin was an “effective treatment for COVID-19.” Among the naysayers, 44 percent said that claim was “probably false” and 22 percent said it was “definitely false.”

Health experts and clinicians have repeatedly stressed that there is no evidence that ivermectin has any efficacy in treating or preventing COVID-19 infections, and the Food and Drug Administration has never authorized the drug for use in treating the coronavirus.

In the same poll, roughly a quarter of people said they believed vaccinations against measles, mumps and rubella caused autism in children, and that COVID-19 vaccines cause infertility. No evidence has so far been found to indicate that immunization against the coronavirus affects male or female fertility.


The claims that vaccines cause autism have long been refuted. Several studies, including one in Sweden published in 2020 that followed children exposed to flu vaccinations for several years, have found no link between vaccinations and autism.

The British physician Andrew Wakefield who originated the claim has since been barred from practicing medicine in the U.K., and the 1998 study he conducted that linked autism to vaccinations has been deemed fraudulent.

Even larger shares of participants believed in misinformation having to do with gun violence, with 60 percent saying they believed “armed school police guards have been proven to prevent school shootings.”

A 2021 analysis of 133 school shootings of 133 school shootings from 1980-2019 found that armed school police officers — who were present in nearly a quarter of school shootings included in the study — were not associated with a significant reduction in gun injuries.

Another 42 percent said they believed people who have firearms in their homes are less likely to be killed by a gun than people without guns at home. In fact, the opposite has been observed, with a 2022 analysis of California adults from 2004-16 finding that overall homicide rates were more than two times higher among people who lived with gun owners than those who didn’t.

While these results indicate a sizable minority of adults believe in disproven claims about health, KFF noted that the rate of people who believe them to be “definitely true” was small overall. The majority of people fell in what the organization referred to as the “malleable middle,” merely being unsure about most of the claims presented to them.

KFF found that certain groups were more susceptible to misinformation than others, including those with lower levels of educational attainment, those who identify as Republican as well as Black and Hispanic adults.

The KFF Health Misinformation Tracking Poll Pilot that was conducted from May 23 to June 12. Pollsters included 2,007 adults in the survey and the results have a margin of error of plus or minus 3 percentage points.
 
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The KFF Health Misinformation Tracking Poll Pilot that was conducted from May 23 to June 12. Pollsters included 2,007 adults in the survey and the results have a margin of error of plus or minus 3 percentage points.
American adults? Or a global selection of 2000 adults?

The ratio of information to misinformation is about 1:47.3. Including this statistic.

You cannot eradicate idiocy with facts and statistics. They have their own facts and statistics.
 

AureliusMaximus

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Belief in misinformation about key health issues persists among a good chunk of adults, with false claims about COVID-19, vaccines and reproductive health garnering a substantial amount of support, a poll released Tuesday by KFF has found.

Whether or not they believed the claims, nearly all participants in the survey were aware of the misinformation, with 96 percent saying they had heard at least one of the 10 claims presented to them. The most widespread misinformation claims had to do with COVID-19 and vaccines.

The new polling data found that a third of adults believed the COVID-19 vaccines “caused thousands of sudden deaths in otherwise healthy people,” with 10 percent believing that claim to be “definitely true” and 23 percent saying it was “probably true.” Another 34 percent said it was “probably false,” and 31 percent said that claim was “definitely false.”

Nearly a third of people also said they believed the parasitic deworming medication ivermectin was an “effective treatment for COVID-19.” Among the naysayers, 44 percent said that claim was “probably false” and 22 percent said it was “definitely false.”

Health experts and clinicians have repeatedly stressed that there is no evidence that ivermectin has any efficacy in treating or preventing COVID-19 infections, and the Food and Drug Administration has never authorized the drug for use in treating the coronavirus.

In the same poll, roughly a quarter of people said they believed vaccinations against measles, mumps and rubella caused autism in children, and that COVID-19 vaccines cause infertility. No evidence has so far been found to indicate that immunization against the coronavirus affects male or female fertility.


The claims that vaccines cause autism have long been refuted. Several studies, including one in Sweden published in 2020 that followed children exposed to flu vaccinations for several years, have found no link between vaccinations and autism.

The British physician Andrew Wakefield who originated the claim has since been barred from practicing medicine in the U.K., and the 1998 study he conducted that linked autism to vaccinations has been deemed fraudulent.

Even larger shares of participants believed in misinformation having to do with gun violence, with 60 percent saying they believed “armed school police guards have been proven to prevent school shootings.”

A 2021 analysis of 133 school shootings of 133 school shootings from 1980-2019 found that armed school police officers — who were present in nearly a quarter of school shootings included in the study — were not associated with a significant reduction in gun injuries.

Another 42 percent said they believed people who have firearms in their homes are less likely to be killed by a gun than people without guns at home. In fact, the opposite has been observed, with a 2022 analysis of California adults from 2004-16 finding that overall homicide rates were more than two times higher among people who lived with gun owners than those who didn’t.

While these results indicate a sizable minority of adults believe in disproven claims about health, KFF noted that the rate of people who believe them to be “definitely true” was small overall. The majority of people fell in what the organization referred to as the “malleable middle,” merely being unsure about most of the claims presented to them.

KFF found that certain groups were more susceptible to misinformation than others, including those with lower levels of educational attainment, those who identify as Republican as well as Black and Hispanic adults.

The KFF Health Misinformation Tracking Poll Pilot that was conducted from May 23 to June 12. Pollsters included 2,007 adults in the survey and the results have a margin of error of plus or minus 3 percentage points.
How much do you earn in bonus per Covid-19 vaccination shot at your job Pierce.Manhammer? :rofl:

1695124757844.png

Well honestly you do not need to answer it as we all know you are going to deny it anyways. So it doesn't matter what you really reply with as an answer.
 
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All_Kindz_Of_Gainz

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COVID-19 vaccines cause heart inflammation, U.S. authorities/CDC now acknowledge, although they did try to hide and bury it for a long time.
So there you have it black and white on paper from the US government itself.

More about this can also be found here:
You dont need too.

The proof is out there and been for a very long time. Here is some examples and you can find thousands more yourself of them if you do a search on the internet. Use Duckduckgo which is not censored search results which Google search is:

Young athletes speak up about risk of sudden cardiac arrest:

A Jaw-Dropping 769 Athletes Have Collapsed While Competing Over The Past Year:

Frontline Flash™ Daily Dose: ‘ATHLETES DROPPING DEAD’ with Dr. Peterson Pierre:

Maybe governments will stop vaccination program if rich athletes continue to drop dead like flies:

Vax, drop, and flop, sports edition; athletes dropping like flies:

The CDC reports are just finally confirming what we known for a long time.. That the Covid-19 do create these lethal issues to the body.
Man, people don't realize how fvcked up all of that is, how instead of waiting for the long terms effect of that vax they went like cattles afraid of losing a $tupid job, or being labelled as anti-vax. I even have families that got it because "trust" the science"

Just imagine in 10 years the TVs ads "If you or your family have taken the covid vaccine, you maybe be entitled for financial compensation"

Just look at all these drugs that were taken out of the market because all the issues they were causing.

 

AureliusMaximus

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Man, people don't realize how fvcked up all of that is, how instead of waiting for the long terms effect of that vax they went like cattles afraid of losing a $tupid job, or being labelled as anti-vax. I even have families that got it because "trust" the science"

Just imagine in 10 years the TVs ads "If you or your family have taken the covid vaccine, you maybe be entitled for financial compensation"

Just look at all these drugs that were taken out of the market because all the issues they were causing.

Yes, indeed.
And then we have have the whole medical industry paying large monetary bonuses to medical staff for each covid-19 shot administered.
(See my previous post above)

Money is always a motivator and will corrupt people and thus some people like our dear SS member Pierce.Manhammer which will keep fighting to defend the old dead narrative because if not they will lose money from a highly profitable vaccination scheme paid by the big pharma companies to them.
 

Millard Fillmore

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You dont need too.

The proof is out there and been for a very long time. Here is some examples and you can find thousands more yourself of them if you do a search on the internet. Use Duckduckgo which is not censored search results which Google search is:

Young athletes speak up about risk of sudden cardiac arrest:

A Jaw-Dropping 769 Athletes Have Collapsed While Competing Over The Past Year:

Frontline Flash™ Daily Dose: ‘ATHLETES DROPPING DEAD’ with Dr. Peterson Pierre:

Maybe governments will stop vaccination program if rich athletes continue to drop dead like flies:

Vax, drop, and flop, sports edition; athletes dropping like flies:

The CDC reports are just finally confirming what we known for a long time.. That the Covid-19 do create these lethal issues to the body.
It's a tracking chip. It won't cause cardiac arrest because they can't track you if you're dead. Don't be a sheeple.
 

AureliusMaximus

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It's a tracking chip.
The Covd-19 shot?
That is taking it way too far i think. Now we're really talking conspiracy theories if that is what you mean....

All the data I've posted here is backed up official data which can be vetted, proven and easily found if you want to find it. But that claim is just tinfoil theories which cannot be proven by any real offical published data from creditable sources.
 

Pierce Manhammer

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You’re making a lot of assumptions. The simple answer is I do not do immunizations, so your question is absurd. You don't even know what part of healthcare I practice. Your confirmation bias is pretty spiked today compared to normal. I'll leave you to it.

At least you'll be a source of a lot of laughter on a long shift this week, so I thank you, brah.

How much do you earn in bonus per Covid-19 vaccination shot at your job Pierce.Manhammer? :rofl:
 
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BackInTheGame78

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Belief in misinformation about key health issues persists among a good chunk of adults, with false claims about COVID-19, vaccines and reproductive health garnering a substantial amount of support, a poll released Tuesday by KFF has found.

Whether or not they believed the claims, nearly all participants in the survey were aware of the misinformation, with 96 percent saying they had heard at least one of the 10 claims presented to them. The most widespread misinformation claims had to do with COVID-19 and vaccines.

The new polling data found that a third of adults believed the COVID-19 vaccines “caused thousands of sudden deaths in otherwise healthy people,” with 10 percent believing that claim to be “definitely true” and 23 percent saying it was “probably true.” Another 34 percent said it was “probably false,” and 31 percent said that claim was “definitely false.”

Nearly a third of people also said they believed the parasitic deworming medication ivermectin was an “effective treatment for COVID-19.” Among the naysayers, 44 percent said that claim was “probably false” and 22 percent said it was “definitely false.”

Health experts and clinicians have repeatedly stressed that there is no evidence that ivermectin has any efficacy in treating or preventing COVID-19 infections, and the Food and Drug Administration has never authorized the drug for use in treating the coronavirus.

In the same poll, roughly a quarter of people said they believed vaccinations against measles, mumps and rubella caused autism in children, and that COVID-19 vaccines cause infertility. No evidence has so far been found to indicate that immunization against the coronavirus affects male or female fertility.


The claims that vaccines cause autism have long been refuted. Several studies, including one in Sweden published in 2020 that followed children exposed to flu vaccinations for several years, have found no link between vaccinations and autism.

The British physician Andrew Wakefield who originated the claim has since been barred from practicing medicine in the U.K., and the 1998 study he conducted that linked autism to vaccinations has been deemed fraudulent.

Even larger shares of participants believed in misinformation having to do with gun violence, with 60 percent saying they believed “armed school police guards have been proven to prevent school shootings.”

A 2021 analysis of 133 school shootings of 133 school shootings from 1980-2019 found that armed school police officers — who were present in nearly a quarter of school shootings included in the study — were not associated with a significant reduction in gun injuries.

Another 42 percent said they believed people who have firearms in their homes are less likely to be killed by a gun than people without guns at home. In fact, the opposite has been observed, with a 2022 analysis of California adults from 2004-16 finding that overall homicide rates were more than two times higher among people who lived with gun owners than those who didn’t.

While these results indicate a sizable minority of adults believe in disproven claims about health, KFF noted that the rate of people who believe them to be “definitely true” was small overall. The majority of people fell in what the organization referred to as the “malleable middle,” merely being unsure about most of the claims presented to them.

KFF found that certain groups were more susceptible to misinformation than others, including those with lower levels of educational attainment, those who identify as Republican as well as Black and Hispanic adults.

The KFF Health Misinformation Tracking Poll Pilot that was conducted from May 23 to June 12. Pollsters included 2,007 adults in the survey and the results have a margin of error of plus or minus 3 percentage points.
Also with AI now, it's pretty easy to create misinformation and get a lot of people believing it...Russia and China have already been using this and showing that it is pretty scary what they can get large sections of their targeted audience to believe.
 

AureliusMaximus

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misinformation
and who decides what " misinformation" or "propaganda" is?

That is the dangerous theoretical hard part to ponder about.

In these days of the internet era all parties produce it and that makes it even harder to determine what is wrong/right or correct or incorrect.

Even governments and other organizations produce propaganda and misinformation to support their agenda or narrative and if you do not support it/them, you will canceled, most likely lose your job, and called things which will absolutely destroy your career and your coming future.

One of the most easiest way destroy people's credibility is to called them names such as "climate denier", "anti-vaxer", "conspiracy theorist", "right-wing extremist", "racist", "islamophob", "domestic terrorist", "free speech absolutist", etc. and the scary part is that it usually works most of the time.

Right now for example Russell Brand is experiencing this where he is being canceled by the official narrative and accused of doing something 10-15 years back by women where is no physical evidence at all to prove it after he went out on a US TV show with some truth bombs which the powers at be doesn't like, (Well that is the theory of why he being targeted at least. See the Twitter video below to get an idea).
But it is working and yesterday Google/YouTube cancelled him and disabled monetization features on his YouTube account.

Do remember that this is not the first time this happened. It has happened to many people now and it always follow the same pattern.

We saw the same pattern during the covid era and how people like scientists, doctors, specialists, opposing politicians etc. were shut down for saying thing that indeed was correct (and also proven correct by science/by data later after covid too), and well supported by data being cancelled because it went against the official narrative and being of course censored everywhere by search engines like Google, social media, mainstream media and governments.

So we are in troubling and concerning times. So who has the right to decide what is "misinformation" and what is right and what is wrong?
In the end maybe its really down to each individual to decide it?

Personally I don't know 100% what to make of it; I just know I'm worried about the direction we are heading; and how we can turn this around as single individuals?

I just read yesterday that nearly a third of Gen-Z support government surveillance Cameras at home. What is going on and why are we moving towards this horrible future?
Should the government really have so much power that they can monitor when you take a huge dump on the toilet? Would you like strangers monitor you at home what you are doing? Maybe even monitor what you can or cannot do in your own privacy or what products/food you are allowed to consume? Do you think this sounds like a wonderful coming future? I'm not saying that it will, but there is certainly signals out there which point in that direction and it is absolutely not in lack of a better word "fun" to watch/read about.


I'm just really concerned about this development towards a more authoritarian society where we lose more and more of our hard earned liberty and rights to our privacy and the decision making over our own lives.
 
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BackInTheGame78

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and who decides what " misinformation" or "propaganda" is?

That is the dangerous theoretical hard part to ponder about.

In these days of the internet era all parties produce it and that makes it even harder to determine what is wrong/right or correct or incorrect.

Even governments and other organizations produce propaganda and misinformation to support their agenda or narrative and if you do not support it/them, you will canceled, most likely lose your job, and called things which will absolutely destroy your career and your coming future.

One of the most easiest way destroy people's credibility is to called them names such as "climate denier", "anti-vaxer", "conspiracy theorist", "right-wing extremist", "racist", "islamophob", "domestic terrorist", "free speech absolutist", etc. and the scary part is that it usually works most of the time.

Right now for example Russell Brand is experiencing this where he is being canceled by the official narrative and accused of doing something 10-15 years back by women where is no physical evidence at all to prove it after he went out on a US TV show with some truth bombs which the powers at be doesn't like, (Well that is the theory of why he being targeted at least. See the Twitter video below to get an idea).
But it is working and yesterday Google/YouTube cancelled him and disabled monetization features on his YouTube account.

Do remember that this is not the first time this happened. It has happened to many people now and it always follow the same pattern.

We saw the same pattern during the covid era and how people like scientists, doctors, specialists, opposing politicians etc. were shut down for saying thing that indeed was correct (and also proven correct by science/by data later after covid too), and well supported by data being cancelled because it went against the official narrative and being of course censored everywhere by search engines like Google, social media, mainstream media and governments.

So we are in troubling and concerning times. So who has the right to decide what is "misinformation" and what is right and what is wrong?
In the end maybe its really down to each individual to decide it?

Personally I don't know 100% what to make of it; I just know I'm worried about the direction we are heading; and how we can turn this around as single individuals?

I just read yesterday that nearly a third of Gen-Z support government surveillance Cameras at home. What is going on and why are we moving towards this horrible future?
Should the government really have so much power that they can monitor when you take a huge dump on the toilet? Would you like strangers monitor you at home what you are doing? Maybe even monitor what you can or cannot do in your own privacy or what products/food you are allowed to consume? Do you think this sounds like a wonderful coming future? I'm not saying that it will, but there is certainly signals out there which point in that direction and it is absolutely not in lack of a better word "fun" to watch/read about.


I'm just really concerned about this development towards a more authoritarian society where we lose more and more of our hard earned liberty and rights to our privacy and the decision making over our own lives.
A fair question...I guess it depends what side of the fence you are standing on since the US and CIA does the exact same thing in countries where they have interests in which side wins.

 

Pierce Manhammer

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@AureliusMaximus

I find myself both perplexed and deeply troubled by your continued propagation of conspiracy theories surrounding the COVID-19 vaccines. Your dogged pursuit of this fallacious narrative is nothing short of baffling and, frankly, a remarkable display of intellectual dishonesty and confirmation bias at its peak. Rumble and 4Chan? Really? Seriously?

Your hypocritical approach of using medical journal retractions and admissions of side effects to bolster your theories, only to dismiss these very same sources when they counter your beliefs, is a disgraceful exploitation of scientific discourse. This selective cherry-picking of information, a convenient dance that suits your narrative, serves as a shining example of how not to engage in an honest discussion based on factual evidence.

Furthermore, your suggestion that healthcare professionals, myself included, receive monetary compensation for vaccinating individuals is a profoundly offensive and reprehensible accusation. It's a slanderous attack on the integrity of countless professionals who have dedicated themselves to the well-being of others, particularly in these trying times. This notion not only undermines the monumental efforts of the global healthcare community but also fosters misinformation and mistrust at a time when unity and factual accuracy are paramount.

I implore you to step back and honestly assess the repercussions of your actions. It's high time to abandon this narrow-minded view that only serves to alienate and misguide. I would strongly urge you to reconsider your stance, refrain from spreading such unfounded theories, and afford the hardworking individuals on the front lines the respect and trust they rightfully deserve.

Your blatant disregard for truth and responsible discourse is not just exasperating but actively harmful.

Your willingness to undermine the vast majority of credible, verified, and peer-reviewed data with baseless allegations and fear-mongering paints a picture of an individual more interested in stoking flames of division than seeking genuine understanding or truth.
 

AureliusMaximus

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@AureliusMaximus

I find myself both perplexed and deeply troubled by your continued propagation of conspiracy theories surrounding the COVID-19 vaccines. Your dogged pursuit of this fallacious narrative is nothing short of baffling and, frankly, a remarkable display of intellectual dishonesty and confirmation bias at its peak. Rumble and 4Chan? Really? Seriously?

Your hypocritical approach of using medical journal retractions and admissions of side effects to bolster your theories, only to dismiss these very same sources when they counter your beliefs, is a disgraceful exploitation of scientific discourse. This selective cherry-picking of information, a convenient dance that suits your narrative, serves as a shining example of how not to engage in an honest discussion based on factual evidence.

Furthermore, your suggestion that healthcare professionals, myself included, receive monetary compensation for vaccinating individuals is a profoundly offensive and reprehensible accusation. It's a slanderous attack on the integrity of countless professionals who have dedicated themselves to the well-being of others, particularly in these trying times. This notion not only undermines the monumental efforts of the global healthcare community but also fosters misinformation and mistrust at a time when unity and factual accuracy are paramount.

I implore you to step back and honestly assess the repercussions of your actions. It's high time to abandon this narrow-minded view that only serves to alienate and misguide. I would strongly urge you to reconsider your stance, refrain from spreading such unfounded theories, and afford the hardworking individuals on the front lines the respect and trust they rightfully deserve.

Your blatant disregard for truth and responsible discourse is not just exasperating but actively harmful.

Your willingness to undermine the vast majority of credible, verified, and peer-reviewed data with baseless allegations and fear-mongering paints a picture of an individual more interested in stoking flames of division than seeking genuine understanding or truth.
I find myself both perplexed and deeply troubled by your continued propagation by your continued defense of a dead narrative.

Good luck with that. Keep on dreaming your pipe dream. :up:
 

Pierce Manhammer

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I'm simply responding to your desperate need to be heard - you've been beating this drum for a while. You will continue to, and I will continue to berate you for it.

You DEFINE confirmation bias and armchair quarterbacking.

I have countless hours in the game SAVING people's lives, people who overwhelmingly spouted the same shyte you are right now.

All you have ZERO firsthand knowledge and parrot the shyte Jones, Tenpenny, and the other imbeciles do.

Come work with me in negative pressure ISO rooms - you wouldn't last ONE shift. Broheem.

I find myself both perplexed and deeply troubled by your continued propagation by your continued defense of a dead narrative.

Good luck with that. Keep on dreaming your pipe dream. :up:
 

AureliusMaximus

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I'm simply responding to your desperate need to be heard - you've been beating this drum for a while. You will continue to, and I will continue to berate you for it.

You DEFINE confirmation bias and armchair quarterbacking.

I have countless hours in the game SAVING people's lives, people who overwhelmingly spouted the same shyte you are right now.

All you have ZERO firsthand knowledge and parrot the shyte Jones, Tenpenny and the rest of those imbeciles do.

Come work with me in negative pressure ISO rooms - you wouldn't last ONE shift. Broheem.
You're funny. Keep it coming. Do please entertain us all. :devil::rofl:
 
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