Time to re-think post workout protein?

Obee1

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For those of us that were taught that we can only assimilate a certain amount of protein in a sitting, a cool study has come out challenging this. This only addresses post training intake. We've been told that anything over (insert number) 50 grams of protein just gets oxidized or converted to glucose through gluconeogenesis. For sedentary or non-training people this still could be the case. It's a small study but they used real people and real bloodwork. One group in the study took in 25 grams and the other group took in 100 grams. The 100 gram group synthesized their protein and stayed in an anabolic state for a longer period of time than the 25 gram group. Check out page 3. The graph shows no excess rise in glucose. Also look at the amino acid profiles. The 100 gram group metabolized the proteins just fine. The name of the study is wild. "The anabolic response to protein ingestion during recovery from exercise has no upper limit in magnitude and duration in vivo in humans."

https://www.cell.com/action/showPdf?pii=S2666-3791(23)00540-2
 

BackInTheGame78

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For those of us that were taught that we can only assimilate a certain amount of protein in a sitting, a cool study has come out challenging this. This only addresses post training intake. We've been told that anything over (insert number) 50 grams of protein just gets oxidized or converted to glucose through gluconeogenesis. For sedentary or non-training people this still could be the case. It's a small study but they used real people and real bloodwork. One group in the study took in 25 grams and the other group took in 100 grams. The 100 gram group synthesized their protein and stayed in an anabolic state for a longer period of time than the 25 gram group. Check out page 3. The graph shows no excess rise in glucose. Also look at the amino acid profiles. The 100 gram group metabolized the proteins just fine. The name of the study is wild. "The anabolic response to protein ingestion during recovery from exercise has no upper limit in magnitude and duration in vivo in humans."

https://www.cell.com/action/showPdf?pii=S2666-3791(23)00540-2
IMO all of that post workout window stuff is smoke and mirrors.

Yes, the body can use nutrients more efficiently in a post workout window(I think it was 4 hours). However what they FAIL to mention is that the body then downregulates protein assimilation/nutrient assimilation so that the total assimilation over a 24 hour period is exactly the same as it would be if you didn't use the post workout window.
 

Ricky

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For those of us that were taught that we can only assimilate a certain amount of protein in a sitting, a cool study has come out challenging this. This only addresses post training intake. We've been told that anything over (insert number) 50 grams of protein just gets oxidized or converted to glucose through gluconeogenesis. For sedentary or non-training people this still could be the case. It's a small study but they used real people and real bloodwork. One group in the study took in 25 grams and the other group took in 100 grams. The 100 gram group synthesized their protein and stayed in an anabolic state for a longer period of time than the 25 gram group. Check out page 3. The graph shows no excess rise in glucose. Also look at the amino acid profiles. The 100 gram group metabolized the proteins just fine. The name of the study is wild. "The anabolic response to protein ingestion during recovery from exercise has no upper limit in magnitude and duration in vivo in humans."

https://www.cell.com/action/showPdf?pii=S2666-3791(23)00540-2
Saw that too. Maybe you are a pump club member also
 

DonJuanjr

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For those of us that were taught that we can only assimilate a certain amount of protein in a sitting, a cool study has come out challenging this. This only addresses post training intake. We've been told that anything over (insert number) 50 grams of protein just gets oxidized or converted to glucose through gluconeogenesis. For sedentary or non-training people this still could be the case. It's a small study but they used real people and real bloodwork. One group in the study took in 25 grams and the other group took in 100 grams. The 100 gram group synthesized their protein and stayed in an anabolic state for a longer period of time than the 25 gram group. Check out page 3. The graph shows no excess rise in glucose. Also look at the amino acid profiles. The 100 gram group metabolized the proteins just fine. The name of the study is wild. "The anabolic response to protein ingestion during recovery from exercise has no upper limit in magnitude and duration in vivo in humans."

https://www.cell.com/action/showPdf?pii=S2666-3791(23)00540-2
This is inline with what Milos Sarcev believes. I'll take his word for it as it's through his personal experience trying to win competitions.
Its around 21 mins in.
 

BackInTheGame78

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Additionally I think this shows that when a study says something that literally goes against how things work in any other animal that exists, we probably want to take a very hard look at it and do many follow up studies on it because it's likely wrong.

Snakes, reptiles, carnivores etc all many times gorge themselves and eat their entire food for several days or more in a single sitting. Are we to believe that humans somehow cannot process more than 25g of protein at once when every other animal that exists can? Makes no sense.
 

Obee1

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Additionally I think this shows that when a study says something that literally goes against how things work in any other animal that exists, we probably want to take a very hard look at it and do many follow up studies on it because it's likely wrong.
Ha! I don't think it's wrong but I spent some of last night to go more in-depth and learned that there are some variables in there that really narrow it's application. I think it is the title that has my antenna up. Very hyperbolic. So that said, I think you have valid points of concern. There wasn't any downregulation in this instance as shown in the amino acid profiles but none of this discounts your observations based on what we know or think we know. Here is why it MAY not be applicable in a 1 for 1 sort of way. This will somewhat support your position probably.

Here are some variables that can't be overlooked. They took untrained young males and resistance trained them to failure. This study is very accurate in the KPI/ bloodwork etc. because they were able to use tracer technology. However, in order to use tracer technology they were only able to use one type of protein, casein. They injected the milk cows to begin the tracing. They milk the cows, and incorporate the milk post workout to the test subjects. Milk is 80% casein. Of course casein is assimilated in the body very slowly. It basically curdles in the stomach. Within 12 hours only not even half of the casein was assimilated, metabolized by the test subjects. Hence, no increase in glucose and no real oxidation. This is a big deal. So their title is misleading.

I don't know enough about tracer technology but it seems as though researchers would not be able to do the same type of testing on whey or egg, or pea proteins. My suspicion is that 100 grams of whey look differently in their bloodwork. If I were to take it down a notch, I think this study really validates an evening protein shake with casein in keeping the body anabolic overnight. I plan on going through it more. It's a great study but the researches may have done themselves a disservice with a misleading title.
 

Ricky

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Yeah Obee1, the protein source seemed interesting. I know for me i can't handle too much whey in one sitting. My stomach starts getting almost a butterfly like feeling from the churning of acid. So lately i've been going on and doing a half scoop or something like 10 gms of whey in the morning and then another 10 gm dose in the evening. I can't imagine doing 100 gms in a sitting, but this milk protein might digest more easily than whey
 

BackInTheGame78

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Yeah Obee1, the protein source seemed interesting. I know for me i can't handle too much whey in one sitting. My stomach starts getting almost a butterfly like feeling from the churning of acid. So lately i've been going on and doing a half scoop or something like 10 gms of whey in the morning and then another 10 gm dose in the evening. I can't imagine doing 100 gms in a sitting, but this milk protein might digest more easily than whey
Whey is pro-inflammatory in more than half of people and causes bloating and chronic low grade inflammation. It did in me which is why I had to switch to green pea and brown rice protein. Nearly the same Amino Acid profile, same perfect 1.0 PDCAAS score, none of the bloating and frustration with inability to lose weight/weight gain.
 

Thebestthereeveris

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For those of us that were taught that we can only assimilate a certain amount of protein in a sitting, a cool study has come out challenging this. This only addresses post training intake. We've been told that anything over (insert number) 50 grams of protein just gets oxidized or converted to glucose through gluconeogenesis. For sedentary or non-training people this still could be the case. It's a small study but they used real people and real bloodwork. One group in the study took in 25 grams and the other group took in 100 grams. The 100 gram group synthesized their protein and stayed in an anabolic state for a longer period of time than the 25 gram group. Check out page 3. The graph shows no excess rise in glucose. Also look at the amino acid profiles. The 100 gram group metabolized the proteins just fine. The name of the study is wild. "The anabolic response to protein ingestion during recovery from exercise has no upper limit in magnitude and duration in vivo in humans."

https://www.cell.com/action/showPdf?pii=S2666-3791(23)00540-2
when i make enough money im doing the rich piana egg white shakes lol
 

AmitBajpayee

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This is a very interesting point! While the study does have good data, I still think that there needs to be a larger, more diverse sample group for the results to be generalizable. Either way, these are very intriguing results
 
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