Looking to do recomposition..recommendations

BackInTheGame78

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Or increase the reps with same weight, and reduce rest time. As long as you are progressively overloading each time you will get results. Took me 3 months of hard dieting, lifting and walking to see results. Weigh yourself and take pictures weekly if not daily. Take your measurements monthly with a tape measure, biceps, chest, waist, hips, thighs, calfs. In a recomp your weight won't be the best measurement when you get to a certain point. I'm 6-7 months into religious training/diet and look like a new man. More weights/reps each workout and sticking to it.
That's the gist of EDT(Escalating Density Training). Basically you pick two opposite exercises(ie one push, one pull), so for instance barbell row and barbell press, set a time, like 10 mins and then do 5 reps of each switching back and forth for as many times as you can in 10 minutes. At the end you compute reps x weight as the total volume for that group.

Combine 3-4 pairings in a workout and that's the workout.

The next week when you do that workout again your goal is to increase the volume from the previous week by either doing more reps with the same weight or lifting more weight for similar reps.

Pretty great after 8 weeks when you compare the volume from the first week with the 8th week.
 

Murk

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Increasing weight vs increasing reps as a strategy actually cause different adaptations. Fitness at its core is a biological adaptation so the body can retain homeostasis. In this case, increasing reps will the muscle better resist fatigue, rather than increasing contractile force.



It is overall good advice. I would add people should have a defined non-aesthetic goal for their training. Aesthetics are the by-product of being fit. As a stand-alone goal, it is ambiguous.
Aiming for 12% BF isn't an aesthetic goal it's a testosterone-producing optimisation goal, my only other goal is to stick to my healthy lifestyle forever.

Also, increasing reps will also build endurance, but compared to adding weight each workout it will allow your nervous system to rest and catch up, adding reps is still progressive overloading and will build muscle if you're training harder than last time.

That's the gist of EDT(Escalating Density Training). Basically you pick two opposite exercises(ie one push, one pull), so for instance barbell row and barbell press, set a time, like 10 mins and then do 5 reps of each switching back and forth for as many times as you can in 10 minutes. At the end you compute reps x weight as the total volume for that group.

Combine 3-4 pairings in a workout and that's the workout.

The next week when you do that workout again your goal is to increase the volume from the previous week by either doing more reps with the same weight or lifting more weight for similar reps.

Pretty great after 8 weeks when you compare the volume from the first week with the 8th week.
This sounds like a good idea when I'm in my home gym. I have limited weights at home so play with reps/rest time and unilateral exercises.

I also obsessively record the weight reps sets and rest time of each workout in a spreadsheet. Just by pushing to near/failure and not fixating on a number, I'm going up in weights and reps every 3 days per body part, flying through. When I get to 20 reps of perfect form, I up the weight.

It might not be the optimum way to train, but I've seen studies that say higher reps when starting out allow you to perfect the form, mind-muscle connection, without risking injury due to heavy weights. It seems perfect for me as a relative beginner doing it this way and I'm progressing.

I've kinda created my own program which works for me and keeps me consistent. When I go into my real gym I lift very heavy and just take advantage of things I don't have at home.
 
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TheManMasenko

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Thanks for all the information, I'm slowing processing and incorporating this stuff into my life.

Would you recommend IF (16-24 hours) and lack on high protein/carbs during recomposition? I tend to deep study which consists of studying for 6 hours + at a time. I don't want to eat any sugar/junk foods. I do eat little fruits though, what are your thoughts?
 

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Also, increasing reps will also build endurance, but compared to adding weight each workout it will allow your nervous system to rest and catch up, adding reps is still progressive overloading and will build muscle if you're training harder than last time.
“Building muscle” is vague. Yes, more reps will build size and endurance. However, it will not increase muscle strength nearly as much as lower rep-high weights. What people miss is that training is a biological adaptation. Training for endurance is not the same as training for strength.

Would you recommend IF (16-24 hours) and lack on high protein/carbs during recomposition? I tend to deep study which consists of studying for 6 hours + at a time. I don't want to eat any sugar/junk foods. I do eat little fruits though, what are your thoughts?
IF is a gimmick. Just eat clean, whole nutritious food. Preferably fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and healthy protein sources (legumes, fish, low fat dairy, eggs, lean cuts of meat). Cut out added fat, oil, and sugar. The recomp will take care of itself following healthy dietary principles.
 

BackInTheGame78

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Thanks for all the information, I'm slowing processing and incorporating this stuff into my life.

Would you recommend IF (16-24 hours) and lack on high protein/carbs during recomposition? I tend to deep study which consists of studying for 6 hours + at a time. I don't want to eat any sugar/junk foods. I do eat little fruits though, what are your thoughts?
No, never cut protein, you will basically ruin whatever you are trying to do by doing that. And I would advise cycling carbs rather than cutting them. You can start with 2 high carb refeeds and 5 lower carb days.
 

TheManMasenko

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No, never cut protein, you will basically ruin whatever you are trying to do by doing that. And I would advise cycling carbs rather than cutting them. You can start with 2 high carb refeeds and 5 lower carb days.
How many carbs do you recommend on low and high days?
 

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“Building muscle” is vague. Yes, more reps will build size and endurance. However, it will not increase muscle strength nearly as much as lower rep-high weights. What people miss is that training is a biological adaptation. Training for endurance is not the same as training for strength.
Might not be optimal, but adding reps is progressive overload and builds muscle, that was my only point.
 

Pedrito0906

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Thanks for all the information, I'm slowing processing and incorporating this stuff into my life.

Would you recommend IF (16-24 hours) and lack on high protein/carbs during recomposition? I tend to deep study which consists of studying for 6 hours + at a time. I don't want to eat any sugar/junk foods. I do eat little fruits though, what are your thoughts?
Im 5'6" as well and I lost 35 pounds using IF in 3 months, hitting the gym hard and no cardio. Started at 16/8, then eventually after like 1.5 months, moved it to one huge meal every 24 hours after the gym. Every two weeks I had one meal where I ate pizza and donuts to have my sanity in check.

Critics are gonna say $hit like always but they never post any pictures of themselves, I got the proof that $hit works if you wanna lose weight.
 

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TheManMasenko

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Im 5'6" as well and I lost 35 pounds using IF in 3 months, hitting the gym hard and no cardio. Started at 16/8, then eventually after like 1.5 months, moved it to one huge meal every 24 hours after the gym. Every two weeks I had one meal where I ate pizza and donuts to have my sanity in check.

Critics are gonna say $hit like always but they never post any pictures of themselves, I got the proof that $hit works if you wanna lose weight.
Dope body but I prefer to have mass. Even if I have some fat, that's cool with me. I just want my muscles to be bulkier.
 

Obee1

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Any book or website recommendations?
Super Squats, Dinosaur Training, Keys To Progress, and Brawn. (Super Squats only if you have a strong stomach as it is not for the timid.) If your not into so called "dirty bulking" which the above books use and have done so for last 100 years, then go with the book Bigger, Leaner, Stronger. I'm older now but in the early 2000's I played human guinea pig and competed in the 198 and 275 weight classes in the same year. I can tell you that competing in the 275 lb class I was big as truck with lots of muscle, and the strongest I'd ever been. At the same time I was probably the most unhealthy I had ever been. Organs had to work overly hard and the sleep apnea was bad. It was an education for sure but I wouldn't recommend it. I am now a strength coach at a local university and weigh 190 at 54 years of age. I also work with wrestlers and powerlifters to manipulate their bodyweight for competition. That said, I am still learning as should you. I prefer dirty bulking because I don't have the time or patience to weigh foods, keep food diary, meal prep, and count calories. If you decide to dirty bulk you better damn well have the confidence to do the reverse and lean out. To me dirty bulking is mentally more difficult than training. The other key, which is as important as diet, is heavy compound lifting in your routine consisting of squat, bench/ overhead pressing, and deadlifts. The bigger and more muscle used, the more the hormonal effect and release/ production of testosterone and HGH. Squats and/or deadlifts do this. Leg presses and extensions not so much. I've dirty bulked on low rep routines and high rep routines. You'll need to experiment for yourself but both work as long as you're working hard and pushing your limits. Below is a link to show extreme dirty bulking. Although effective I wouldn't recommend this either. But it shows the extreme that some have effectively used to gain weight and muscle. Good Luck to you.

 

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BackInTheGame78

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“Building muscle” is vague. Yes, more reps will build size and endurance. However, it will not increase muscle strength nearly as much as lower rep-high weights. What people miss is that training is a biological adaptation. Training for endurance is not the same as training for strength.



IF is a gimmick. Just eat clean, whole nutritious food. Preferably fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and healthy protein sources (legumes, fish, low fat dairy, eggs, lean cuts of meat). Cut out added fat, oil, and sugar. The recomp will take care of itself following healthy dietary principles.
IF is not a gimmick. IF is about manipulating your hormones for optimal fat loss. Personally I think 5:2 is better than every day IF if I was choosing between one or the other tho and I have tried both extensively and currently use 5:2.
 
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Obee1

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Increasing weight vs increasing reps as a strategy actually cause different adaptations. Fitness at its core is a biological adaptation so the body can retain homeostasis. In this case, increasing reps will the muscle better resist fatigue, rather than increasing contractile force.



It is overall good advice. I would add people should have a defined non-aesthetic goal for their training. Aesthetics are the by-product of being fit. As a stand-alone goal, it is ambiguous.
I'll disagree and agree here. EyeBRollin your statements are fact and sound advice but I have a little bit of a different perspective. "Increasing weight vs increasing reps as a strategy actually cause different adaptations." Yes, but there are different ways to to change volume and intensity within various rep ranges before one has clearly gone one way or the other. Several examples: 5x5's can serve both. Each set of 5 can get gradually heavier as you move into the last two or three sets for the working sets. Say 90% of max for last two sets. Or one can warm-up and go 80-85% for 5 working sets. OR last 2 working sets can be a set of 5, and the last set for AMRAP (As many reps as possible). When 8 reps are completed on last set the working weight is increased and the last set backs down to 5+ reps again.

"I would add people should have a defined non-aesthetic goal for their training. Aesthetics are the by-product of being fit. As a stand-alone goal, it is ambiguous." I believe for the general population, especially the younger bros, that it should be whatever goal most motivates you and gets you to the gym is the one you go with. In order of importance EyeBRollin is correct but go to the club on Friday night and you quickly see women are more of a priority then their health as they drink up the courage to run game. As they get older their goals hopefully change. With the right routines, lifting for aesthetics will get you healthier. I've been in strength sports a long time aside from training performance athletes. I figured if I was Squatting and deadlifting 650-700 lbs and benching 450-500 lbs than I will look like I move those said weights. When I got out of strength sports, I tweaked my diet and what do you know? There was a physique contest quality body. I'm ridiculously splitting hairs but just saying. I've seen your previous threads and it's obvious you know what you are talking about while giving solid advice.
 

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I'll disagree and agree here. EyeBRollin your statements are fact and sound advice but I have a little bit of a different perspective. "Increasing weight vs increasing reps as a strategy actually cause different adaptations." Yes, but there are different ways to to change volume and intensity within various rep ranges before one has clearly gone one way or the other. Several examples: 5x5's can serve both. Each set of 5 can get gradually heavier as you move into the last two or three sets for the working sets. Say 90% of max for last two sets. Or one can warm-up and go 80-85% for 5 working sets. OR last 2 working sets can be a set of 5, and the last set for AMRAP (As many reps as possible). When 8 reps are completed on last set the working weight is increased and the last set backs down to 5+ reps again.

"I would add people should have a defined non-aesthetic goal for their training. Aesthetics are the by-product of being fit. As a stand-alone goal, it is ambiguous." I believe for the general population, especially the younger bros, that it should be whatever goal most motivates you and gets you to the gym is the one you go with. In order of importance EyeBRollin is correct but go to the club on Friday night and you quickly see women are more of a priority then their health as they drink up the courage to run game. As they get older their goals hopefully change. With the right routines, lifting for aesthetics will get you healthier. I've been in strength sports a long time aside from training performance athletes. I figured if I was Squatting and deadlifting 650-700 lbs and benching 450-500 lbs than I will look like I move those said weights. When I got out of strength sports, I tweaked my diet and what do you know? There was a physique contest quality body. I'm ridiculously splitting hairs but just saying. I've seen your previous threads and it's obvious you know what you are talking about while giving solid advice.
5x5s are for beginners. You are only going to get so far with that
 
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Does more reps increase muscle definition or is it just diet?
 

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This statement is absurd. Do you want to clarify?
Not absurd at all. You cannot continue to do the same rep range for long periods of time without stagnating, nor is it good to constantly push the CNS by lifting heavy all the time, you'll eventually hit a wall.

It takes a while to figure this stuff out on your own but once you do you'll be better for it. I'd recommend no more than 8 weeks on any one program or rep range and prefer some fluctuation within the program(and at times within the same workouts even) even in that 8 week period.
 
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