Juggling College and Minwage Job?

AlexKaiser

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My inner-go-getter has kicked in. I'm not happy being locked into relying on a Gas Station Job to live, so the voice said "Then aim for college." I thought to myself, I don't want to waste money learning something that won't be profitable, so the voice said "Go into Business, learn about Stock Marketing and Small Business" (i've always been interested in dealing with the stock market since I began selling Yugioh/Magic the Gathering cards in my teens, and avidly being able to turn a profit on cards that were going up and down in value). I worried about the financial strain of going into a big college (University of Montana would cost me a lot) so the voice recommended my local community college, where I have access to FAFSA, Indian Fee Waivers and a couple other things to break the costs. Now, in order to maintain my room-mate free, parent-free, independent lifestyle, while also pursuing college education, I have to do classes, AND work my job.

I've never really tried something like this before. I make 9 dollars an hour, enough to cover my 450/month rent (utilities included, which is a bonus). but the work at the gas station is exhausting (I think about quitting every single day), and I fear that college might be just as exhausting too.

Have any of you ever juggled full-time work and college work at the same time? How much stress should I expect, and do you have any tips I could use? Any red flags to watch out for, or mistakes to avoid? I know to stay away from parties, and to complete the work as soon as possible, but that's about it.
 

Von

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My inner-go-getter has kicked in. I'm not happy being locked into relying on a Gas Station Job to live, so the voice said "Then aim for college." I thought to myself, I don't want to waste money learning something that won't be profitable, so the voice said "Go into Business, learn about Stock Marketing and Small Business" (i've always been interested in dealing with the stock market since I began selling Yugioh/Magic the Gathering cards in my teens, and avidly being able to turn a profit on cards that were going up and down in value). I worried about the financial strain of going into a big college (University of Montana would cost me a lot) so the voice recommended my local community college, where I have access to FAFSA, Indian Fee Waivers and a couple other things to break the costs. Now, in order to maintain my room-mate free, parent-free, independent lifestyle, while also pursuing college education, I have to do classes, AND work my job.

I've never really tried something like this before. I make 9 dollars an hour, enough to cover my 450/month rent (utilities included, which is a bonus). but the work at the gas station is exhausting (I think about quitting every single day), and I fear that college might be just as exhausting too.

Have any of you ever juggled full-time work and college work at the same time? How much stress should I expect, and do you have any tips I could use? Any red flags to watch out for, or mistakes to avoid? I know to stay away from parties, and to complete the work as soon as possible, but that's about it.
Currently doing it and I am in finance. The success rate in finance is 10% (people who make money) and the world is rapidly changing for us.

Make a list of what you love, what you wanna do, what you hate.

Take your decision....

You have to be good to succeed and to succeed what you do must make you happy.

College will give you tools to succeed but it won't do the work for you (you'll have to fight)

If you want a job after College, take a technical degree

Now, you'll be surprised how ''manual specialised labour'' pays aka plumbing etc...

All the people I know who were in Social or Liberal programs end up in finances...

From what you said.. you like stuff related to trading... check those out

PS: School and Work is 2 full time jobs :p
 

Xenom0rph

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A college degree is worth it as long as you major in something practical like accounting, nursing, human resources. I would avoid majors like art, psychology, humanities and basically anything that doesn't provide you with a skill set.

A college degree opens up a lot of doors to get a foothold in corporate America and from there you can climb the latter and eventually work your way up to a senior manager or director and basically get paid to do nothing.

I would definitely recommend going to community college and doing your general education there before transferring to university -- it's cheaper this way.

However, if college isn't the right option for you I would suggest going to a trade school to learn skills like welding, Air conditioning/HVAC repair, plumbing, etc..... I know an HVAC guy that owns his own business that makes $300K per year doing maintenance on HVAC's for corporate offices here in Los Angeles. People think the dude is some bigshot CEO or a movie director or banker and when he tells them he's an air conditioner repair man they're in disbelief.
 
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logicallefty

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I did 35 hours per week and full time college (electrical engineering), but never the full 40 hours of work. It can be done but you have to plan out every hour of your week carefully. My general schedule, give or take, was job#1 7:00am-10:00am. Class from 10:30-am-3:30pm. Job #2 from 4:00pm-8:00pm. Then homework from 8:30pm-12:30am or longer. Was usually off Saturdays and then would work 12pm-6pm on Sundays at job #2.

- Make sure you eat good. Don't eat foods that will make you sleepy.
- If you have to squeeze in a 30 minute power nap somewhere, do it. It will help you get through the day.
- Get away from people and other things that will distract you from your school work. I would do my homework stint at the end of the day at the library or somewhere else, but not at home because I knew that once I went home I'd be distracted or just want to go to bed.
 

AlexKaiser

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Currently doing it and I am in finance. The success rate in finance is 10% (people who make money) and the world is rapidly changing for us.

Make a list of what you love, what you wanna do, what you hate.

Take your decision....

You have to be good to succeed and to succeed what you do must make you happy.

College will give you tools to succeed but it won't do the work for you (you'll have to fight)

If you want a job after College, take a technical degree

Now, you'll be surprised how ''manual specialised labour'' pays aka plumbing etc...

All the people I know who were in Social or Liberal programs end up in finances...

From what you said.. you like stuff related to trading... check those out

PS: School and Work is 2 full time jobs :p
What I love to do actually, is write stories and draw (digital and traditional). However, I've worked at McDonalds with people who went to college SOLELY for art, and didn't learn crap about how to market themselves, or were unwilling to step out of their comfort zone...which is why they were at McDs. From what I read, writing is a maddening career as well (being at the mercy of publishers and being rejected for months/years straight) so neither of the things I enjoy have a steady or guaranteed method of payment. However, making side money from doing **** I love would be a major bonus.

Stock Broking and playing the short game on investing seems like something I could do, and a lot of people here seem familiar with Vanguard and have had success with it I believe.
 

Von

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What I love to do actually, is write stories and draw (digital and traditional). However, I've worked at McDonalds with people who went to college SOLELY for art, and didn't learn crap about how to market themselves, or were unwilling to step out of their comfort zone...which is why they were at McDs. From what I read, writing is a maddening career as well (being at the mercy of publishers and being rejected for months/years straight) so neither of the things I enjoy have a steady or guaranteed method of payment. However, making side money from doing **** I love would be a major bonus.

Stock Broking and playing the short game on investing seems like something I could do, and a lot of people here seem familiar with Vanguard and have had success with it I believe.
So you see the importance of pushing yourself.

You'll always be happy doing what you love

Make that list (interest, love, hate)... read on subject

So you love to draw and write stories... it's great skills for finance, marketing, sells, psychology, teaching. Also maybe Artificial Intelligence development?

You'll have to update your definition of stock broking... if you want to do stock broking for a career it means having to sell ''your stock brokers skills''. So you have to convince people and talk to people into investing with you. That's actually my career: Financial Planner and Stock Broker

Also Vanguard is a company that mostly do Index Funds... Index Funds are funds like any others but built to ''track an index'' to remove stockbrokers from the ''wealth management equations''... however since they an investment they have to answer ''when, how, why'' (thus require activement management from a broker)

Why people are doing great with Vanguard? The market been going up 20% average since 2008.... so one no one is making mistakes.... when it crashes you'll see a big change in attitude.

Actually, its when the market crash that people are more interested in meeting an ''advisor'' (people are sad, have difficult time with bad decisions, tired of managing, don't wanna repeat mistakes) because when it goes up... they are all genius cause the market is going up and no mistakes are possible.

Finance is an emotional work.... Picking index funds are part of the stock broker job now, also if you pick stocks... you could have failures even if the market is going up... hence people love for index (you can't beat them, join them attitude).

I love my work, its a family business for me so I am lucky. However, my words remain.... In finance only 10% of the people working in it... make money... and its more psychology than numbers. Rules are changing and it makes it more difficult for people to join, so you'll have to have top skills to win and a love to read (Financial Planner, Master in Fiscality, etc..)
 

logicallefty

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and its more psychology than numbers.
Psychology is becoming a bigger element in most any career from the lowest jobs to the highest. Knowing how to properly use psychology in the workplace can keep you from saying things around certain people that will get you in trouble, or, make you say the right things around the right people that will get you rewarded. In any work setting when a new player steps into the game the FIRST thing I do is determine if they are legit or if they are a bunch of dead space with two legs. The people who are dead space are the ones to really be careful around. Because they are looking for ANY tiny excuse to take you down in an effort to bring themselves up. Deep down they know they are dead space with two legs and don't do anything productive for anyone. But they have to work. They don't really want to be there. Bottom Line: The workplace these days is a jungle. Anyone who says any less is just fooling themselves. And psychology is one of your best tools to help you navigate this dangerous jungle without being eaten alive.
 

Von

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A college degree is worth it as long as you major in something practical like accounting, nursing, human resources. I would avoid majors like art, psychology, humanities and basically anything that doesn't provide you with a skill set.

A college degree opens up a lot of doors to get a foothold in corporate America and from there you can climb the latter and eventually work your way up to a senior manager or director and basically get paid to do nothing.

I would definitely recommend going to community college and doing your general education there before transferring to university -- it's cheaper this way.

However, if college isn't the right option for you I would suggest going to a trade school to learn skills like welding, Air conditioning/HVAC repair, plumbing, etc..... I know an HVAC guy that owns his own business that makes $300K per year doing maintenance on HVAC's for corporate offices here in Los Angeles. People think the dude is some bigshot CEO or a movie director or banker and when he tells them he's an air conditioner repair man they're in disbelief.
Specialized manual labor is big thing now.

It face alot of "oligarchic system" (players are getting smaller but bigger) but if you launch in business with a good contact book (like in anything, you'll have a easier time in plumbing or air conditioning than been a lawyer/finance lol)

Also, it's a job that doesnt get yourself dirty anymore.

Is it prestigious? A cultivated job? Maybe not.. but if you can make 300 000k working 80 hours à week, not worrying about clients... Life is good
 

AlexKaiser

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Specialized manual labor is big thing now.

It face alot of "oligarchic system" (players are getting smaller but bigger) but if you launch in business with a good contact book (like in anything, you'll have a easier time in plumbing or air conditioning than been a lawyer/finance lol)

Also, it's a job that doesnt get yourself dirty anymore.

Is it prestigious? A cultivated job? Maybe not.. but if you can make 300 000k working 80 hours à week, not worrying about clients... Life is good
I don't know if I can do that in Montana but I could try. It sounds like it would beat out cashiering.

From what I read by the guy who owns Berkshire, "If you're not comfortable with losing thousands and thousands of dollars in a few seconds, then investing isn't for you." The thing is, I am.
 
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