IT Lawyer?

nicksaiz65

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I’ve always had thoughts of being a Lawyer. I love Public Speaking, the Salary seems very good, and it seems just like a very powerful Don Juan type job. Heck, even RSDOwen was working on becoming a lawyer before he went solely into pickup.

I’m pursuing a degree in Computer Science as an undergraduate. How possible would it be to be a lawyer after this? What would I need to do?

I may not travel this path, and I may just try to be a developer. But if I do, it could end up being very lucrative for me. Any of you seasoned Don Juan’s have any experience in this area?
 

Fzatf

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I’ve always had thoughts of being a Lawyer. I love Public Speaking, the Salary seems very good, and it seems just like a very powerful Don Juan type job. Heck, even RSDOwen was working on becoming a lawyer before he went solely into pickup.

I’m pursuing a degree in Computer Science as an undergraduate. How possible would it be to be a lawyer after this? What would I need to do?

I may not travel this path, and I may just try to be a developer. But if I do, it could end up being very lucrative for me. Any of you seasoned Don Juan’s have any experience in this area?
Lawyers work long hours and have a high depression rate; however, the money is really good.

Computer science has high demand and you can find a cushy 6 figure job. You won't make as much as a good lawyer but the education is cheaper and you can work a 40 hour work week.
 

Bible_Belt

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Dear God, no! Don't do it. Law degrees are everywhere. My neighbor has one, and actually tried to get any other job she could, even at minimum wage, and no one would hire her. I have one, too, and unless you are a licensed and practicing attorney, it is academic and career suicide. No one will ever hire you again if they find out about the degree.
 

nicksaiz65

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Dear God, no! Don't do it. Law degrees are everywhere. My neighbor has one, and actually tried to get any other job she could, even at minimum wage, and no one would hire her. I have one, too, and unless you are a licensed and practicing attorney, it is academic and career suicide. No one will ever hire you again if they find out about the degree.
Lol sarcasm?
 

nicksaiz65

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Lawyers work long hours and have a high depression rate; however, the money is really good.

Computer science has high demand and you can find a cushy 6 figure job. You won't make as much as a good lawyer but the education is cheaper and you can work a 40 hour work week.
I feel you. I may be willing to trade my time and money for happiness lol
 

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dasein

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Haven't been around these parts in awhile, good to see some old hands posting still.

If you have an entrepreneurial nature, are not extremely introverted, and willing to do a little smiling and dialing/targeted Email, a legal practice is one of the best small businesses to start... once the opportunity cost is overcome. This is because of a relatively high barrier to entry and 99% of lawyers being crap at sales and networking. It is a great business to bootstrap up because technology allows you to do it yourself with very little startup costs.

For example, I do lots of IT legal work these days with moderate tech background in software and hardware. In any middling city or larger, there are hundreds of IT businesses in the 1-5 mill revenue range who need a general counsel on call but don't have enough work or spare $$ for a fulltime GC. I can do this from anywhere, and am currently negotiating a big chunk of referred work from a new prospective IT client I haven't met and may never meet in person. So you can do the work from anywhere you have a few tech office basics... that every business hotel has these days.

Caveats. The BIG one is that 99% of legal practice, even litigation, is not "public speaking," but rather reading the same stacks and stacks and stacks of documents over and over and over again. Repetitive enough? Good, let it sink in. The law is mostly huge amounts of text, and if that turns you off, steer way clear. If you have very high reading comprehension on standardized tests, 90% or higher, this is surmountable. If not, it will drive you insane.

The other BIG caveat is law school will teach you less than nothing about being a competent, effective business lawyer. Law schools are heavily weighted toward litigation and outlier fact patterns/gotchas. So getting the degree and license is just the start of your training, which can be at some kind of firm or self-taught via the net... but this is a bit tough to do without some oversight from experienced practitioners.

Final caveat is opportunity cost. The time and money spent on a law degree are immense in that department. Would recommend another career path to most people considering it due to this alone. Best wishes with your career!
 
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logicallefty

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As a police officer who has worked in cybercrimes before, I would love to see more lawyers who have the IT/tech specialty. I've had at least 3 good cases blown in my career because my prosecuting attorney's office was down right scared of the case because of the technical element that it had. In these cases, no matter how much I tired to simplify my presentation of the evidence to the prosecutor and show just cause, the tech was so far over their head that they couldn't deal with it and wouldn't file any charges.
 

Bible_Belt

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As a police officer who has worked in cybercrimes before, I would love to see more lawyers who have the IT/tech specialty. I've had at least 3 good cases blown in my career because my prosecuting attorney's office was down right scared of the case because of the technical element that it had. In these cases, no matter how much I tired to simplify my presentation of the evidence to the prosecutor and show just cause, the tech was so far over their head that they couldn't deal with it and wouldn't file any charges.
The way law school admissions works is that they consider your gpa and your lsat score, but give no weight to the difficulty of your major or undergrad program. So if you are a quintuple major in every stem program there is, assuming you and I have the same lsat, then my degree in underwater basket weaving will rank me higher than you if I edge you out by .01 on gpa. That is why anyone with a non liberal arts degree is at a disadvantage in law school admissions, and why there are so many lawyers ignorant of technology.
 
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