Heart rate after the vid

Machine10033

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Right after Christmas came down with covid. Wasn’t bad at all 2 days of sneezing and only reason I tested was wife was positive and usually take my elderly Aunt grocery shopping.

I had no fever, no aches, felt decent snd 3 days after testing positive went to do a back work out in my home gym. I had to stop...was out of breath and heart rate sky rocketing.

gave it a few days and got back into it. Started running again and it feels brutal... HR is still thru the roof.... running a slow paced 4 miles my HR was averaging 160bpm... and hit 190 a few times when I pushed it. Prior to covid my hr rarely hit 170 even on exhaustive runs.

has anyone else experienced this ? I literally don’t feel sick at all.
 

EyeBRollin

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No. I still never had covid. I’m a zombie.

On a serious note, you are fine. Heart rate is a good indicator of recovery (or lack of). That means you got back into it too quickly after the illness. Your body is still recovering. I’d take a few more days off maybe even a week then start back SLOWLY.
 

Stanley

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I have experienced exactly this following contracting Covid. Hardly felt sick at all, but noticed a general malaise and lethargy. Working out also caused me to gas out super fast when I thought I was fine. I think you're probably good and just need to give it some time. Obviously, if things get worse and persist then go to a doctor.
 

HaleyBaron

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Still waiting for people to stop acknowledging that covid is a real ailment.
 

Ricky

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Still waiting for people to stop acknowledging that covid is a real ailment.
You are the first woman ive met that has expressed
That sentiment
 

Pierce Manhammer

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Right after Christmas came down with covid. Wasn’t bad at all 2 days of sneezing and only reason I tested was wife was positive and usually take my elderly Aunt grocery shopping.

I had no fever, no aches, felt decent snd 3 days after testing positive went to do a back work out in my home gym. I had to stop...was out of breath and heart rate sky rocketing.

gave it a few days and got back into it. Started running again and it feels brutal... HR is still thru the roof.... running a slow paced 4 miles my HR was averaging 160bpm... and hit 190 a few times when I pushed it. Prior to covid my hr rarely hit 170 even on exhaustive runs.

has anyone else experienced this ? I literally don’t feel sick at all.
What is your current resting heart rate? Do you have a Fitbit per chance?
 

HaleyBaron

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Aside from the childish responses, my statement remains.
 

BackInTheGame78

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You better be careful with that...may have myocarditis which could lead to serious issues or even death...that was found to be a cause for concern with athletes, many of whom were perfectly healthy prior.

Actually had a player on our NFL team that missed an entire season with heart related issues from COVID.

Do not play games with that, get to a cardiologist ASAP.
 

Pierce Manhammer

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There could be many reasons for this. In our 40s, we start looking at blood pressure; when did you last check it? Can you go to a pharmacy with an automatic BP machine and check yours? You must handle it if it's higher than 120/80 (recently, the AHA raised this to 130, but 120 is a baseline).

Atrial fibrillation is a covert actor; many people have it and do not realize it until something wrong occurs. Also, some cardiovascular incidents could have happened. I would set up a consult with a cardiologist if you can do it without a referral, or if you need one, get to your general practitioner to get one.

It is estimated that 12.1 million people in the United States will have AFib in 2030. The symptoms include shortness of breath, palpitations, fatigue and weakness, dizziness or lightheadedness, and chest discomfort. You need not have all of these if you have it. However, a paradoxical increase in RHR is cause for concern; it could also be left ventricular hypertrophy, a pulmonary embolism, or other things.

"An analysis of five U.S. medical claims databases suggests as many as 23% of 5.6 million to 6.6 million presumptive atrial fibrillation cases are undiagnosed, with many undiagnosed patients likely eligible for oral anticoagulant treatment. Mar 27, 2023"- NIH

This is something that you should not ignore. As mentioned, get yourself to a cardiologist; they will do an EKG, which will be definitive for arrhythmias and may decide to do a stress test or echocardiogram, which are all non-invasive and fast.
 
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EyeBRollin

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This is something that you should not ignore. As mentioned, get yourself to a cardiologist; they will do an EKG, which will be definitive for arrhythmias and may decide to do a stress test or echocardiogram, which are all non-invasive and fast.
Also, they may order a holter monitor (24 hour ekg). Good check to do. I had one last year.
 

BackInTheGame78

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Also, they may order a holter monitor (24 hour ekg). Good check to do. I had one last year.
Yeah I've had those a few times. Actually see a cardiologist yearly now and have had several stress echos done since being diagnosed with AFib about 10-12 years ago. Only episode I ever had but literally would not wish that on my worst enemy. Thought I was going to die
 

Pierce Manhammer

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Persistent afib can be the outcome of sleep apnea, which may lead to left ventricular hypertrophy, cardiac insufficiency, fatal and non-fatal clots like pulmonary embolisms and DVT.

All guys over 40 should get baselines done by cardiologists…
 

BackInTheGame78

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Persistent afib can be the outcome of sleep apnea, which may lead to left ventricular hypertrophy, cardiac insufficiency, fatal and non-fatal clots like pulmonary embolisms and DVT.

All guys over 40 should get baselines done by cardiologists…
I'd recommend people get a stress echo done if they are over 40...could catch some things early on before they lead to very bad or fatal events. Especially things like knowing your ejection fraction rate, etc that you can't get with normal tests.

They freaked me out when I was at the hospital with AFib because they came in the morning and did an echo while I was in bed laying down and she told me I had a very low ejection fraction rate(like 42% or something) and I definitely need to go see a cardiologist.

I was pretty scared but when I went to the cardiologist he was like I don't know what the hell they are talking about because yours is pristine at 68% which is basically the upper range of normal. Have had 2 others since over the last 5 years that showed the same thing.

Ended up finding out they aren't trained very well to do those in the hospital and to not really believe their result.
 

Pierce Manhammer

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Stress echocardiograms are usually done after you get on a treadmill and run up to 85% of your predicted max recommended HR, then you hop on the table on your left side and they do the echo. If your EJ is 68 they REALLY messed up that reading, I’d ask for a refund of your copay.
 

BackInTheGame78

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Stress echocardiograms are usually done after you get on a treadmill and run up to 85% of your predicted max recommended HR, then you hop on the table on your left side and they do the echo. If your EJ is 68 they REALLY messed up that reading, I’d ask for a refund of your copay.
That's high normal...the 42% one for sure would be bad.

I'm well aware of what they are, I've had 3 of them done in the past 10 years. Maybe 4. The last time I had one they were actually getting annoyed because it was taking so long to get my heart rate where it needed to be even after they kept increasing speed and incline.

68% is very good. 70% is considered the top.

1705018119662.png
 
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Pierce Manhammer

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We’re in agreement…

‘splainin was for those not in the know…
 

FlexpertHamilton

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Still waiting for people to stop acknowledging that covid is a real ailment.
The first time I got Covid and I lost my sense of smell and taste and had lethargy and bad headaches. My sense of smell is still almost completely gone and taste is muted. If that wasn't from Covid idk what it was.
 

Pierce Manhammer

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The first time I got Covid and I lost my sense of smell and taste and had lethargy and bad headaches. My sense of smell is still almost completely gone and taste is muted. If that wasn't from Covid idk what it was.
I'm pretty sure it was 5G. My cell's connection bars increased from 2 to 5 after I got vaxxed and steaks I was trying to cook flew off the grill and stuck themselves to my vaccination site.
 
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