Comprehensive Diet Thread

CAPSLOCK BANDIT

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This post is very long and verbose, just a friendly warning if your looking for a digestible read.

If you examine most professional body builders who have storied careers, most of them have a similar story about needing to change how they are fueling their bodies every now and then.

For me, I do so much better on carbs but it also causes the bloat, don't get me wrong the gym pump is unrivaled; setting a PR? I need carbs, end of story.

When I first began rotating my diet, I went from Carbs to Keto, because I wasn't doing the keto diet properly I ended up giving myself gallstones and basically destroyed my gallbladder, some of these gallstones also made it past my gallbladder into my bile duct, an issue im still dealing with 4 years later, it's incredibly dangerous and the most common route to bile duct cancer which is commonly fatal... I wish somebody had told me all this stuff before I changed my diet! To me, it was just fuel, didn't think all these complications could arise from it.

Now, I can still do keto but it involves maximizing my time between meals, quite a bit of intermittent fasting and recognizing there's limits to what I can digest, but it's all a learning experience.

So after all my experiences, I understand that carbs are best for building muscle, while keto is more for leaning out, trimming down the fat while maintaining the muscle, it's been a struggle since I started this in 2019, had a ton of hurdles as I talked about above, but now that it's dialed in, this is just different, I've completely changed my body!

From 2011 to 2019 I spent all this time in the gym, which I now understand I was basically floundering and wasting my time because the diet was not dialed in. The diet is everything, it's so much more important than being in the gym, you can't recover right or build muscle right if you aren't hitting your macro balance, but when you find the balance, the progress you can make is insane.

So here's what I've learned that have changed my diet game and maybe it'll serve you as well:

1. When you are weaning yourself off of carbs, you have to be very careful to not spike your insulin levels; insulin regulates our hunger cravings, there is a very real threshold, if you pass this threshold by a single carb your gonna spike your insulin and you'll experience hunger cravings that will make you think your about to faint if you don't eat, this is the most common point of failure when weaning off carbs...
Even worse, even if you satiate this craving, it'll be back again in an hour or 2, it's the friggin worst.

To mitigate this, you never want to consume carbs that digest fast during this time, you want something with lots of fibre, my go to is Oatmeal. The most common point of failure food: Protein Shakes!!! Protein Shakes can have 0 carbs on their nutrition value chart, but our body can only digest a certain amount of protein, for plant based protein that is 17%, meaning the other 83% of that protein is bring converted into carbs, there's your insulin spike right there because this is a drink, not a food, it's going to be digested very fast.

Next common point of failure: blending fruits, a common diet trick which is absolutely terrible for you, if your doing it, stop now. I'm just gonna cut the list out why and paste it here as it's long why but it's from this site: https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/consuming-whole-fruits-vegetables-rather-than-juicing-dr-shilpa

Fiber content: Whole fruits and vegetables contain dietary fiber, which is an important component for digestive health and helps promote feelings of fullness. When fruits and vegetables are juiced or blended into smoothies, the fiber content is often reduced or eliminated. Consuming the whole fruit or vegetable allows you to benefit from the fiber, which aids in digestion, regulates blood sugar levels, and supports a healthy gut.
Satiety and portion control: Eating whole fruits and vegetables requires more chewing and takes longer to consume, leading to a greater sense of satiety. The fiber and bulk in whole produce help you feel fuller for longer, which can aid in portion control and prevent overeating.
Nutrient retention: Freshly juiced or blended fruits and vegetables can still provide essential vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. However, exposure to air and light during juicing or blending can cause some nutrient loss. Consuming whole produce helps retain the natural nutrients more effectively.
Blood sugar management: Whole fruits and vegetables generally have a lower glycemic load compared to juices and smoothies. The fiber in whole produce slows down the release of sugars into the bloodstream, which can help manage blood sugar levels. Juices and smoothies, on the other hand, can lead to a more rapid increase in blood sugar due to the concentrated sugar content.
Chewing and oral health: Chewing whole fruits and vegetables stimulates saliva production, which aids in digestion and promotes good oral health. Chewing also signals the brain that you are eating, contributing to the feeling of satisfaction and enjoyment during a meal.
Mindful eating: Consuming whole fruits and vegetables encourages mindful eating practices. Taking the time to eat and savor the texture, taste, and aroma of whole produce can enhance the overall eating experience and promote mindful and intuitive eating habits.

Main take away is that our saliva must coat the food we eat to help aid in digestion, if you give your saliva no chance to coat your fruit, your going to raise your blood sugar rapidly which will cause an insulin spike and then your craving.

Continued in next post, hit character limit
 
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CAPSLOCK BANDIT

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Now, I'll move onto protein. If you have never heard of Nitrogen Spiking or Amino Spiking, then you need to read this before you spend another dollar on protein products because a lot of you are getting f'd over by the marketing. Again, I'm gonna cut this article for y'all to read from this site: https://endurelite.com/blogs/free-n...-it-is-and-how-to-spot-it-in-a-protein-powder

Amino spiking is when manufacturers add amino acids like glycine, arginine, glutamine, and creatine to their protein powders.

Amino spiking artificially inflates the protein quantity. Instead of getting 25 grams you may only be getting 10-15 grams.

Companies use amino spiking to rip you off and make an extra buck.

Never buy a protein powder that has these amino acids listed in the "other ingredients" section on the supplement facts panel.

Nitrogen Spiking is most commonly found in protein bars, not only are they full of carbs but often the protein count is inflated, so what is even the point then.

Next with protein, I've already made reference to it, but Absorption Rates and Utilization Rates... You've heard the term "Not all calories are equal" that is a true statement, you can figure out why yourself easily, but alongside calories, the same could also be said, "Not all protein is equal", even if you take 20 grams of plant protein and 20 grams of animal protein, these 2 are very very different!

this is a long verbose speel but it's still necessary to read for newbies as it includes caveats, not all this information is factual but rather just the most updated research.

Ripped from this site: https://nakednutrition.com/blogs/protein/protein-absorption-rate-chart

Protein absorption refers to the process of breaking down protein into amino acids which are then absorbed through the lining of the small intestine and into the bloodstream.

To maximize muscle protein synthesis, it’s best to spread protein intake out throughout the day and consume sources of protein that have high absorption rates.

Research suggests that consuming 20-30 grams of protein at one sitting is best to optimize muscle protein synthesis, and extra protein may offer no additional benefit.

The rate of protein absorption can vary between individuals depending on age, activity level, differences in digestion and metabolism, and protein source.

After amino acids are absorbed through the small intestine, they are transported by the bloodstream to tissues and organs. But first, all amino acids must pass through the liver.

The liver is a central hub for amino acid metabolism, as it regulates how and where they are distributed. Amino acids can be utilized for protein synthesis, energy production, or other metabolic processes.

If the body is in need of energy, some amino acids can be converted to glucose through a process called gluconeogenesis, while others can be utilized for energy right away through a process known as amino acid oxidation.

If amino acids aren’t needed, they can get converted to glycogen and are stored in the liver for later use.

Muscle protein synthesis is the process in which the body creates new muscle proteins. Amino acids are necessary to stimulate this process.

Consuming high-quality protein that contains all essential amino acids is necessary to optimize the muscle protein synthesis process. Additionally, timing protein intake around exercise can also optimize muscle protein synthesis.

Focusing on consuming foods and supplements rich in high-quality protein is necessary to optimize muscle growth and recovery.

The anabolic ceiling is a concept that suggests there is a limit to how much protein the body can absorb and utilize at one time. This suggests that consuming protein beyond what the body can make us of does not provide any additional benefit.

However, some research suggests that the anabolic ceiling may be actually higher than initially thought.

Before delving into how much protein is ideal to consume at one sitting, it’s important to distinguish protein absorption vs utilization.

Protein absorption refers to the process in which amino acids are absorbed through the small intestine and into the bloodstream.

This process is essentially unlimited and the body can continue to digest and absorb protein. However, there is a limit to how much protein can actually be utilized for muscle protein synthesis at one time.

The most updated research suggests that bodies can effectively make use of up to 40 grams of protein at one sitting, which is higher than the 30 grams per sitting that was previously thought (1).

While not everyone may benefit from 40 grams of protein at once, some people can efficiently utilize this high dose of protein to optimize muscle protein synthesis, especially after a tough workout.

The general recommendation for healthy adults is to consume 0.8 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight daily.

Some people require more protein than the general recommendation. Athletes and those with higher energy expenditures can require up to 2.2 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight daily to support muscle repair, recovery, and growth (2).

Older adults may have higher protein needs, at about 1-1.2 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight, to support age-related muscle loss.

Keep in mind that these are general recommendations and individual needs will vary. You can obtain more accurate and personalized results from using an online protein needs calculator or by consulting with a Registered Dietitian to provide personalized recommendations

There are individual differences in the rate of protein absorption, which is why it’s challenging to determine an exact limit. However, it is evident that the body continues to absorb and use protein over several hours.

Protein is absorbed gradually as it’is broken down into amino acids, absorbed through the lining of the small intestine, and then into the bloodstream.

The rate at which absorption occurs will depend on individual metabolic differences, the protein source, and the presence of other nutrients.

To most efficiently absorb and utilize protein, spread protein intake out throughout the day rather than consuming a hefty dose in one sitting.

NPU or Net Protein Utilization is a complex concept, you can view it along with references at the wiki below, but generally speaking Plant Based Proteins carry around a 17% utilization rate, while Animal based proteins will consistently be around 10-20% higher than plant based protein. The holy grail of protein utilization is a whole egg, the egg white is a plant based protein, but the yolk is loaded with so much amino acids it actually raises the absorption rate to close to 50%.


I will probably add more to this later, this is already a crazy long post
 
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BackInTheGame78

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Plant proteins in their whole forms are absorbed less effectively but in plant based protein powders the difference between whey is negligible. Anyone trying to use plants in their whole forms for protein is probably looking at soy and that is a disaster in and of itself. Outside of Tempeh which is a fermented soy and actually a nutrient powerhouse with both pre and pro-biotics that I will actually eat on occasion.


Additionally, newer research shades the notion that the body can only absorb 20-30 g of protein at once.


One of my favorite "tools' for increasing protein absorption is the use of something called "Amino Gen" which uses various strains of fungus to act as proteases, or enzymes that break down protein into smaller parts and make it easier for the body to use.

Studies have shown significant improvements in protein and BCAA levels as well as Leucine(the KEY amino acid as it's the marker the body uses to determine protein levels).


Use to be super cheap to get but seems to have gotten more expensive. Once I run out I might just get some protease enzymes instead which theoretically should all do similar things and are 1/3 of the cost.
 

CAPSLOCK BANDIT

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Plant proteins in their whole forms are absorbed less effectively but in plant based protein powders the difference between whey is negligible. Anyone trying to use plants in their whole forms for protein is probably looking at soy and that is a disaster in and of itself. Outside of Tempeh which is a fermented soy and actually a nutrient powerhouse with both pre and pro-biotics that I will actually eat on occasion.


Additionally, newer research shades the notion that the body can only absorb 20-30 g of protein at once.


One of my favorite "tools' for increasing protein absorption is the use of something called "Amino Gen" which uses various strains of fungus to act as proteases, or enzymes that break down protein into smaller parts and make it easier for the body to use.

Studies have shown significant improvements in protein and BCAA levels as well as Leucine(the KEY amino acid as it's the marker the body uses to determine protein levels).


Use to be super cheap to get but seems to have gotten more expensive. Once I run out I might just get some protease enzymes instead which theoretically should all do similar things and are 1/3 of the cost.
I've cut out all supplements basically, I only eat food, most ill do is blend cereal. I'll divide my egg yolk into halves, that's my only protein supplement I use.

I might start supplementing just because my cholesterol is taking a beating but the response I get is so good, I'll use it in both carb and keto it's becoming a bit of a problem haha.

I used to shell out like $400 every time I went to the supplement store, probably every month and a half, instead put that money onto buying higher quality food.
 

CAPSLOCK BANDIT

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So the summary is….?
It's hard to provide a summary because a lot of the information is either anecdotal or just what is presumed to be the top of the line research for right now, will likely change.

I suppose in spirit of the thread, summary would be to educate yourself before you decide to go over the deep end, what you eat might just seem like food but it really does come to define your life, either health wise or fueling yourself for the gym.
 
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