Advice needs from the gym experts.

The Diver

Senior Don Juan
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#1
What is more efficient workout technics to gain muscles:

1) Same amount of reps for all the sets with the same weight size?
For example, 5 sets of 10 reps with the same size weight.

Or

2) Reducing the amount of rep's for every set, but increasing weight size?
For example, 12, 10, 8, 6, 4 reps with increase wight size, every, says, 2 sets.

The deferent that I see between the two options is that in option 1 I'll do more reps overall, comper to option 2 but with less weight.

Thanks
 
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#2
If you are natural, lifting heavy is absolute key. High reps has it's place but only second to lifting heavy.
 

marmel75

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#3
The answer is to mix it up. Dont do the same set pattern every workout...Heck, dont even do the same set pattern inside each workout itself...try a wide variety of set patterns to target different muscle fibers.

I do agree that lifting heavy is a requirement. If you lift heavy for a long enough period of time you can basically do whatever you want after that with your lifting and maintain most of your size.
 

17 shots

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#4
Lift till failure every set, no matter what you're lifting. If you can do the same number of reps every set, then you're not working out hard enough

I lift heavy on compound lifts that work multiple muscles, like bench press, and squats. On isolation moves like bicep curls I go light

Let's say I can bench press 180 5 times on my first set, I'll keep benching that until the day comes where I can get it off me 10 times on my first set. Once I accomplish that, I'll add 10 pounds to each side and repeat the process
 

The Diver

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#5
Thanks guys.
I went to the gym today and practised what you suggested.
I increased the weight drastically to the point where I can't do more than 6-8 reps in 3 sets, and I could feel the muscles working really hard comper to what I used to do bf. I believe from now on I'll see a significant progress.
Cheers
 

The Diver

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#6
Let's say I can bench press 180 5 times on my first set, I'll keep benching that until the day comes where I can get it off me 10 times on my first set. Once I accomplish that, I'll add 10 pounds to each side and repeat the process
Are you increasing weight when you reach the point where you can complete 10 reps on the first set, or when you can do a 10 solid reps in all 3 sets?
 
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#9
Search for a good program with a fixed rep scheme and with a planned progression. You wouldn't venture into the jungle without a GPS, so do the same at the gym.
You need to know if you are progressing or not to make necessary changes. Nsuns 5/3/1, regular 5/3/1, GZCL, VDIP... Pick one and stick with it.
 

marmel75

Master Don Juan
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#10
Thanks guys.
I went to the gym today and practised what you suggested.
I increased the weight drastically to the point where I can't do more than 6-8 reps in 3 sets, and I could feel the muscles working really hard comper to what I used to do bf. I believe from now on I'll see a significant progress.
Cheers
You also need to eat enough calories to bulld and maintain the muscle as well.
 

Espi

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#11
In my opinion doesn't make any diiference whatsover. Key is to keep it really simple:

Less food, more exercise=good results
Less exercise, more food=bad results

In my opinion ANY exercise program done with consistency and intensity WILL yield results. 10 reps...20 reps...doesn't matter as long as those reps are INTENSE.

Combine this with a solid eating program and you WILL look leaner and more muscular.

It's that simple. Not easy. But simple.

What is more efficient workout technics to gain muscles:

1) Same amount of reps for all the sets with the same weight size?
For example, 5 sets of 10 reps with the same size weight.

Or

2) Reducing the amount of rep's for every set, but increasing weight size?
For example, 12, 10, 8, 6, 4 reps with increase wight size, every, says, 2 sets.

The deferent that I see between the two options is that in option 1 I'll do more reps overall, comper to option 2 but with less weight.

Thanks
 

Espi

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#13
Lift till failure every set, no matter what you're lifting. If you can do the same number of reps every set, then you're not working out hard enough
Definitely disagree. There was a time that I used to believe in this.
 
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#15
The answer is either. There have already been studies on this, as well as plenty anecdotal evidence. Sets performed with 30% of 1rm to mechanical failure elicited similar results in hypertrophy as training with 80% of 1rm to mechanical failure. The only thing that matters in eliciting a positive adaptation in hypertrophy or strength (outside of recovery and nutrition) is doing enough, and not too much, work to trigger an adaptation, period. More weight, more volume, the same amount of volumr performed in a shorter time frame, the same amount of volume performed in a longer time frame, etc. They all work. Some methods better, than others for eliciting a specific adaptation. Whichever way is more efficient is highly dependant on goals and dominant fiber type makeup. Do them all. Determine a specific goal and know which tools are the most efficient at achieving a positive adaptation. Maximal strength is king in regards to ALL special strengths (speed-strength, strength-speed, strength endurance, etc), but it doesn't make a lick of sense to keep adding weight to the bar if lack of muscle or supporting tissues lack the endurance to stabilize the weight. Periodize your training. Find a good cookie cutter strength focused program, that also allows room for supplemental and assistance movements, stick you it and go from there.
 
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The Diver

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#16
Thanks for your feedback guys

I search the subject of losing weight and gain muscles at the same time, knowing that most gym rats will say it's impossible to do both at the same time. But I wanted to give it a go.(Spoiler, It is possible)

I'm not a big guy, only 5'7 , and want to lose around 5kg fat and "replace" them with muscles.
So what I l did:
I cut 500 Cal from my daily Cal'
Eat 1g protein per pound of body weight.
Eat no more than a 150g Carb a day.

It wasn't easy in the beginning to follow the above, but I'm already eating healthy for many years now, and it was just the issue of keeping eyes on the numbers.
My diet is a variation of Rolled oat, bananas, tuna, turkey breasts, scotch pork fillet, avocados, beans, eggs, cottage cheese salad, salmon, wholemeal crackers, and I'm treating my self with two squares of dark chocolate 70% cocoa a day. Whey protein after a workout. also no sugar or junk food.

I'm training 5 days a week doing lifting and cardio.

Now, after 8 weeks, my weight stays almost the same, but I can see I'm losing the fat part around my waistline. (I measured it bf I started the training, and I'm already lost around 1-2 inches, but the best indicator for me to know is how much hols I use in my trousers belt, lol ), also I can see more muscles on my body.

In my first month I worked to strengthen my body and focused on correct form, but now I feel my body got stronger and that I can lift more, but didn't know what's better: lifting more weight or increases reps in order to maximise my time I spend in the gym. hence my post.
 
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#17
Thanks for your feedback guys

I search the subject of losing weight and gain muscles at the same time, knowing that most gym rats will say it's impossible to do both at the same time. But I wanted to give it a go.(Spoiler, It is possible)

I'm not a big guy, only 5'7 , and want to lose around 5kg fat and "replace" them with muscles.
So what I l did:
I cut 500 Cal from my daily Cal'
Eat 1g protein per pound of body weight.
Eat no more than a 150g Carb a day.

It wasn't easy in the beginning to follow the above, but I'm already eating healthy for many years now, and it was just the issue of keeping eyes on the numbers.
My diet is a variation of Rolled oat, bananas, tuna, turkey breasts, scotch pork fillet, avocados, beans, eggs, cottage cheese salad, salmon, wholemeal crackers, and I'm treating my self with two squares of dark chocolate 70% cocoa a day. Whey protein after a workout. also no sugar or junk food.

I'm training 5 days a week doing lifting and cardio.

Now, after 8 weeks, my weight stays almost the same, but I can see I'm losing the fat part around my waistline. (I measured it bf I started the training, and I'm already lost around 1-2 inches, but the best indicator for me to know is how much hols I use in my trousers belt, lol ), also I can see more muscles on my body.

In my first month I worked to strengthen my body and focused on correct form, but now I feel my body got stronger and that I can lift more, but didn't know what's better: lifting more weight or increases reps in order to maximise my time I spend in the gym. hence my post.
Good job. Heavy lifting Maintain and build muscle. The cardio and diet strip the fat.
 
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#18
Having a progression plan is the determining factor.I'd say choose any of the two you like best

If you go for straight sets (not adding weight), chase first set and total rep personal records
For example if I did overhead press with 135 lbs X 11,8,6,5,5 (35 total reps) next time I'd put on 135 lbs I'd go for 12 reps on the first set and 36+ total reps.Do not use the same weight every workout or you'll stall

If you add weight every set, again, go for personal records.It's ok to make previous sets easier to break a records, just make sure you do some tough work after that.For example if I were to break my incline dumbbell press record with the 80s, which was 8 reps, I'd go like that
20s X 20
40s X 8
60s X 3-5
80s X hopefully 9+
90s X 3
60s X a few all out sets

Record progress on only the first 1-3 movements, not on pump stuff
 
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#19
Thanks for your feedback guys

I search the subject of losing weight and gain muscles at the same time, knowing that most gym rats will say it's impossible to do both at the same time. But I wanted to give it a go.(Spoiler, It is possible)

I'm not a big guy, only 5'7 , and want to lose around 5kg fat and "replace" them with muscles.
So what I l did:
I cut 500 Cal from my daily Cal'
Eat 1g protein per pound of body weight.
Eat no more than a 150g Carb a day.

It wasn't easy in the beginning to follow the above, but I'm already eating healthy for many years now, and it was just the issue of keeping eyes on the numbers.
My diet is a variation of Rolled oat, bananas, tuna, turkey breasts, scotch pork fillet, avocados, beans, eggs, cottage cheese salad, salmon, wholemeal crackers, and I'm treating my self with two squares of dark chocolate 70% cocoa a day. Whey protein after a workout. also no sugar or junk food.

I'm training 5 days a week doing lifting and cardio.

Now, after 8 weeks, my weight stays almost the same, but I can see I'm losing the fat part around my waistline. (I measured it bf I started the training, and I'm already lost around 1-2 inches, but the best indicator for me to know is how much hols I use in my trousers belt, lol ), also I can see more muscles on my body.

In my first month I worked to strengthen my body and focused on correct form, but now I feel my body got stronger and that I can lift more, but didn't know what's better: lifting more weight or increases reps in order to maximise my time I spend in the gym. hence my post.
That's awesome news and it doesn't seem like it took that long either. Body recomping definitely works, especially if ones diet is out of control to begin with. Getting in higher amounts of protein if lacking can go a long way, as protein is the most inefficient macronutrient for your body to convert into energy. The simplest way to approach your question is to cycle your volume and intensity. Get as strong as you possibly can on the big 3 or 4, with higher(ish) intensities, until you stall and then decrease your poundages by a significant amount and push the volume and focus on hypertrophy a little more. Unless, you are competing, You can focus on both concurrently, just make either strength or hypertrophy the main focus at the time. If you are in a strength block, push the intensity on the main lifts and cut back the volume on supplemental and assistance movements. If you are in a hypertrophy block, cut back on the intensity of the main lifts and increase the volume on the main lifts, supplemental or assistance. Bodybuilders, powerlifters and even endurance athletes cycle their programming. Many bodybuilders, cyclists, rowers, long distance runners, etc will lift heavy in the off-season, where as powerlifters and other anaerobic power athletes will focus on lower intensity/higher volume phases in the off-season. The best advice I can give you, is to keep an intensive log, get an idea of your baseline of tolerable intensity and volume, that you can recover from, while still progressing and increase your baseline slowly over time (YEARS). Keep track of PR's (weight and reps) and smash them, whenever possible. Whenever possible means, not at the expense of your progress. Learn to be aware of bar speed and path. PR attempts, when things start to get heavy, more often than not, can get sketchy. If you are working up to an old PR and that chit just flys up, take another attempt. If bar speed slows to a crawl, your bar path starts getting out of groove and your technique goes to chit, pull back the reins. If you hit a wall a few weeks in a row, take a deload week or cycle your programming. Learning to know your body and how to listen to it will take you further, than any one thing, in the iron game.
 
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#20
Here's what I day on leg day (it applies to every other day as well)

- Squats - 1 warm up set with 1 plate (10 reps), 1 warm up set with 2 plates (8 reps), 3 sets of 5 reps with 3 plates, 1 - 2 sets of 1 - 3 reps with 4 plates, 3 sets of 5 pause reps with 2 plates, 2 sets of 20 reps with 1 plate
- Dead lifts - 1 warm up set 10 reps, 1 moderate weight set 6-8 reps, 2 heavy weight sets 5 reps, 2 moderate weight sets of 5 reps at deficit, 1 set of 20 reps light weight.
- Leg Press - 4 sets of 8-12 reps, 10-12 plates on each side with different foot positioning each set. 2 sets of 20 reps with 6-8 plates on each set (by the end I'm about dead). 1 set till failure with 3-4 plates
- Extensions and Curls superset. For these, I switch each training session from light weight high rep to heavier weight moderate reps (never go too heavy on isolation, and focus a lot of the eccentric portion of the rep).
- Calves - 5-8 sets of 15-30 reps.

So basically start your workouts with heavy and tiring compound movements. Then move to lighter weight isolation where you focus on the negative portion of the movement. Focus on getting your strength up on the compounds and endurance up on the isolation. If you get stronger on the big lifts while being able to go longer and slightly stronger on the iso's, you are making huge progress. Then it's time to change your workout up and try different isloation movements. Switch your training up every 6 weeks or so.
 
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