Which Fields are good to get into?

Fzatf

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With decent competency and determination to learn and work hard, which industries are best to get into these days? Something that doesn't cost as much as going to medical school or law school. Something perhaps requiring a bachelor degree or trade school education. What would you recommend to yourself if you could go back and tell your younger self which path to follow?

I'm currently pursuing a bachelor degree in computer science and had believed I would pursue programming; however, I don't find myself programming anymore than is required by assignments. I also get frustrated not knowing how to make my code do what I want without spending a significant amount of time on it. I have worked doing IT at a basic help desk level, but that's not a high skill career that pays well. My goal is to make enough that I don't struggle paycheck to paycheck and can manage to save for my retirement.
 
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Stephen89

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Check the udacity nanodegree's out, you could complete them within 3-6 months such as android, ios mobile app development, vr development, AI, machine learning, robotics, data scientist etc.

Being a chartered accountant is a good one. Also plumbing pays well and you could run your own team.
 

Fzatf

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flipping houses is good and can get you nice car
Frogman style? Lol. I could see getting into real estate, but I was thinking that's how I might invest extra money from my career
 

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Fzatf

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Yeah im thinking ill finish my bachelor degree in computer science and decide if programming, networking, or becoming a system administrator is for me. Ill have to look into the courses @Stephen89 suggested.
 

billtx49

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I T Is the future. With a degree you can work for any company that needs a highly skilled person and possible project manager. Don’t like the real estate company, go to work for a jewelry company. My daughter has done it while helping support her family while husband was in Med school…
The employment possibilities are endless in that field…
 

Fzatf

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Check the udacity nanodegree's out, you could complete them within 3-6 months such as android, ios mobile app development, vr development, AI, machine learning, robotics, data scientist etc.

Being a chartered accountant is a good one. Also plumbing pays well and you could run your own team.
I noticed your threads about programming and wanted to see how you feel about it. Do you ever feel lost like you don't know how to solve your code and just stare blankly at your code for a few minutes? Sometimes I question my aptitude for coding as it's the most difficult thing I've ever done. Calculus is straight forward because we're taught how to solve specific problems. With coding it's like you're shown bits of code and how it works and then you're given a project that you have to figure out how to solve on your own. It's very different from the education I'm used to.

Is how I feel normal and I just need to work my way through the hard stuff so I can do it later with ease, or is programming not for me?
 

billtx49

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I noticed your threads about programming and wanted to see how you feel about it. Do you ever feel lost like you don't know how to solve your code and just stare blankly at your code for a few minutes? Sometimes I question my aptitude for coding as it's the most difficult thing I've ever done. Calculus is straight forward because we're taught how to solve specific problems. With coding it's like you're shown bits of code and how it works and then you're given a project that you have to figure out how to solve on your own. It's very different from the education I'm used to.

Is how I feel normal and I just need to work my way through the hard stuff so I can do it later with ease, or is programming not for me?
Do some research and apply on upping your problem solving abilities.
 

Bible_Belt

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The thing with computers is that the other kids in your class are probably dorks who love the stuff. They spend their free time doing that, because they like it, and probably were doing so a long time before they enrolled in that class. If you don't enjoy the subject matter, you dont have much of a chance competing against other students who do. And that is part of the idea behind pursuing your passion - you will out-work others because it does not seem like work.

Along those lines, I have business plan going right now, which is taking all my money and time, and paying nothing at all until at least mid 2019. But it is fun to me, and what I like doing. I think the money will be huge, eventually, but my interest in the topic is what keeps me at it until then.
 
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Stephen89

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I noticed your threads about programming and wanted to see how you feel about it. Do you ever feel lost like you don't know how to solve your code and just stare blankly at your code for a few minutes? Sometimes I question my aptitude for coding as it's the most difficult thing I've ever done. Calculus is straight forward because we're taught how to solve specific problems. With coding it's like you're shown bits of code and how it works and then you're given a project that you have to figure out how to solve on your own. It's very different from the education I'm used to.

Is how I feel normal and I just need to work my way through the hard stuff so I can do it later with ease, or is programming not for me?
Coding is hard, you will have to practice and practice to get better and for me it's based on logic.

I feel good about it to be honest, I enjoy programming. As others have said IT is the future and that's where most of the demand is at.

I'm developing my own projects and it's how you understand programming that makes you a good programmer, you could also check stackoverflow answers is you ever get stuck. Just dive into it and create your own projects and it that way you'll become a competent programmer.

As stated, there's lots of demand and the pay is good for full stack web developer, software developer. You can also run your own business.

Udacity nanodegree's are good such as android, ios development, AI, data scientist, machine learning etc. There's also free content on youtube.

Networking has a lot of demand too and it pays well, do a n+, then get some volunteer work somewhere and shoot for the CCNA.

I think you should finish your degree, which will stand you with great options and it's a sense of accomplishment.
 

Spaz

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I have a question, if I were to hire IT personnel, to basically cover server/data/work programs related issues that serves basically 30 odd countries, what is the ideal back ground I should be looking for ?

Also, how good r those guys with udacity degree's?

I'd appreciate some pointers to assist me in reviewing the hiring process.
 

EyeBRollin

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Find a way to earn $100,000 / year.

There are many paths. If you plan on primary job + side hustle, you could get to this number with a $70,000-$80,000 / year salary in your primary field. Find a job that pays as such, research the education and training requirements and get to it.
 

Fzatf

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Find a way to earn $100,000 / year.

There are many paths. If you plan on primary job + side hustle, you could get to this number with a $70,000-$80,000 / year salary in your primary field. Find a job that pays as such, research the education and training requirements and get to it.
Right now the plan is programming; however, I'm considering other computer science options such as networking or being a system administrator. It just is unfortunate that I'll probably end up with 20k in student loans. However, if I get the job I'll be able to pay it off. Though I've read and watched videos from guys who did it without college.
 

EyeBRollin

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Right now the plan is programming; however, I'm considering other computer science options such as networking or being a system administrator. It just is unfortunate that I'll probably end up with 20k in student loans. However, if I get the job I'll be able to pay it off. Though I've read and watched videos from guys who did it without college.
Don't listen to people who say college isn't necessary. Those who make it without a degree are the exception not the rule.
 
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Anonimmus

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What do you think about sport betting? Is it good idea to start? I'm a big expert in football, I think I can do profitable bets. Also there are many websites which can help, for example I use https://777score.com/ to watch all results and statistics of football matches.
 

Xenom0rph

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I work in accounting and it pays very well ($100k) and there's a lot of job security because not too many people can do it in the real world, they crack under pressure. I'm also about to get my license to sell Life, Accident and Health insurance and possibly run that as a side hustle. If it goes well I'll also get a license to sell property and casualty insurance as well.

I've also got some other plans in the works to help me retire by 45 and spend the rest of my life working out, travelling, riding motorcycles and having s3x with hookers and strippers...
 

synergy1

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I managed to break into software after previously working in other technical fields. I was self taught and got an entry level job and worked my way into it. The title is official now, but I have been doing development for a few years now.

I can only speak for myself when I say I am always confused with software. A lot of the apprehension comes from not knowing the right questions to ask, and what tools/ programing patterns to use. I have that often enough at the start of doing this professionally. So if you feel confused or lost, I don't think you are alone. A lot of the folks in our QA department don't like to program at all either, but have been in the space for years. Its not an easy task to undertake.

If you stick with software, you don't nessesarily have to do development work. You can work with the IT and develop systems. Another very good field right I am leaning towards is a DevOps type role. This is the intersection between software development, systems admin, and IT systems. You have to use some programming skills, some Linux OS skills, and have knowledge of how the systems are put together. its more operations oriented, which can be more interesting to some people. The benifits are, as others have pointed out, great pay and ability to work remotely. DevOps is a key component towards any organization that is going to the cloud and needs a 24/7 SAAS product. The best part is there is no bootcamp, so you don't get Thousands of javaScript developers being churned out by coding camps to compete against.

If you have questions feel free to PM me. I can try to help you out. I think you are on the right path, and should stick with software for a few years at the very least. Earn some money, figure out if you like it, than how to proceed next.

best of luck.
 

synergy1

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The thing with computers is that the other kids in your class are probably dorks who love the stuff. They spend their free time doing that, because they like it, and probably were doing so a long time before they enrolled in that class. If you don't enjoy the subject matter, you dont have much of a chance competing against other students who do.
I respectfully disagree with some of this statement. Here is why. First, you do have people who absolutely enjoy coding all day and all night. It is true many developers I know work on projects outside of work. Most of these people are employed and paid very handsomely. However, for specific skill-sets, there is still a dearth of talent out there allowing the right applicant to find a high paying position, even if they don't have the same enthusiasm as people at hackathons. Someone in this position would be able to speak to their experience better, but this could be said of anyone in any field. The fact is, good developers are hard to come by and are likely getting paid a lot of money to stay put since they understand their codebase and how things work. They aren't going to just move unless conditions are suboptimal for them.

I will conceed and say that I agree on the part of enjoying what one does to some degree for success. This passion can ( and often is) developed on the job. You don't need to be in hackathons to have this. Heck, I trade stocks on the side and have gotten promoted 2 times in the last 2 years with 3 pay raises and no formal training in software. Now, I did train myself and that did help a lot...but I am a far cry from someone who does this stuff in their sleep.
 

DEEZEDBRAH

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With decent competency and determination to learn and work hard, which industries are best to get into these days? Something that doesn't cost as much as going to medical school or law school. Something perhaps requiring a bachelor degree or trade school education. What would you recommend to yourself if you could go back and tell your younger self which path to follow?

I'm currently pursuing a bachelor degree in computer science and had believed I would pursue programming; however, I don't find myself programming anymore than is required by assignments. I also get frustrated not knowing how to make my code do what I want without spending a significant amount of time on it. I have worked doing IT at a basic help desk level, but that's not a high skill career that pays well. My goal is to make enough that I don't struggle paycheck to paycheck and can manage to save for my retirement.
Get better at problem solving. Comp Sci is great. I was never a great programmer but, the technical analyst skills were excellent for making a lateral move in business.

According to RooshV, nothing with a HR.

If you cannot save now, you won't later. Save minimum 12% on every dollar. Talk to a financial advisor. See if your workplace will match or double your contribution.

Seek other sources of income and information to make moves.
 
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