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Reliable Cars

EyeBRollin

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My girlfriend's dad had a bolt, which she would borrow for long trips and often come home with a speeding ticket.
The Bolt is nutty. Bolt and Volt are on par with V6 Camaro in 0-40 mph tests. No top end speed though and governor limited to 100 mph. Fun around town. I’m not sure why they tune them that way.

Not trying to brag or anything but I have 8 cars in my stable and Tesla is one of them. I wouldn't buy one just because the gas prices are high. It will take you anywhere from 5-10 years to realize the cost savings depending on how much you drive.
Tesla base price is too high. An “affordable” car such as Nissan Leaf or Hyundai Iconiq will realize those savings much sooner. Also, power is free at municipal charging stations and pay to park garages. Overnight charging at my place in Jersey I pay $.07 / KWH, which translates to ~146 MPGe in average driving.
 

Lookatu

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Tesla base price is too high. An “affordable” car such as Nissan Leaf or Hyundai Iconiq will realize those savings much sooner. Also, power is free at municipal charging stations and pay to park garages. Overnight charging at my place in Jersey I pay $.07 / KWH, which translates to ~146 MPGe in average driving.
Car prices are relative and you aren't comparing apples to apples. Power is free at some places but you can't exactly park it overnight without either paying for parking garages. It's not feasible if have to get a ride back to your house from a location where you're leaving the car for extended periods of time.

Just to give you an idea but it will take around 8+ hours to fully charge a Tesla using 35amp 220v power.
 

EyeBRollin

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Car prices are relative and you aren't comparing apples to apples. Power is free at some places but you can't exactly park it overnight without either paying for parking garages. It's not feasible if have to get a ride back to your house from a location where you're leaving the car for extended periods of time.
Perhaps I didn’t make myself clear. Electric vehicle owners charge their car at home. However, in cases where one parks at a garage for work or the airport for a trip, charging is often complementary. That power is “free,” as you are paying to park either way. The point of having an electric battery operated vehicle is stored power.

Just to give you an idea but it will take around 8+ hours to fully charge a Tesla using 35amp 220v power.
Yes, I own a level 2 charger in my garage. Standard charging rate is 7-8 Kw per hour. Charging chord on standard plug it’s about 1 kWh per hour. I’ve charged via wall outlet at probably 95% of hotels I’ve stayed at in the last 3 years. “Free” power.
 

Gstring

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Reliable Cars:
Mercedes is reliable, but not cheap to own. Japanese cars are on the whole 'nother level of reliability. You can not touch Toyota or Lexus in terms of reliability. Then comes Honda. Nissan is not reliable, especially Nissan with an automatic. Misubishi is not reliable. Subaru is not reliable. For domestics, Ford over Chevy, always.

Reliability comes with proper maintenance. Oil should be changed every 3000 miles. Factory recommends every 15000 miles, and you have a problem right there.

What could possibly break in a car? Alternator and air conditioner is not a problem. Squicky water pump is not a problem. Balljoins and wheel bearings is not a problem. Problem is gearbox and engine. Japanese cars have excellent build tolerances, much more precise across the board, best quality control, this is why they are reliable. They are precision machines. Germans suck at reliability mainly because of inline 6 engines, those have long cranks and cams and they tend to bend at high rpm, chewing bearings. Chevy sucks because it uses pushrod engines. Ford is better, it has overcam V8, 4 times less wear and tear on camshafts.

Cars that draw women's attention:
Anything BMW and Mercedes, but not old. Mustang, Camarro, Corvette. Sporty oriental rice cars.
 

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Reyaj

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I drive a 2018 Chevrolet Volt. Cross shopped the model 3 and volt but decided on the plug-in hybrid being vastly superior in practicality. I can drive as an electric car 100% on daily commuting but can go on a spontaneous road trip without searching for public charging station. The built quality of Tesla compared to standard automakers is also exceptionally poor for the price premium.

Electric cars drive better than their gas counterparts due to superior acceleration, silence, and lower center of gravity. The tax incentives and lower cost of ownership don’t hurt either...
I am going to show how stupid I am when it comes to these new cars but with the rise of gas prices I need to know...

So Tesla is fully electronic right? Relies on charging stations?

The Volt is a Hybrid so it can use both gas or electric? If so how much of each does it need to go? Can you choose any charging station or it has to be Chevrolet? I've only ever seen Tesla charging stations...
 

wifehunter

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EyeBRollin

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I am going to show how stupid I am when it comes to these new cars but with the rise of gas prices I need to know...

So Tesla is fully electronic right? Relies on charging stations?

The Volt is a Hybrid so it can use both gas or electric? If so how much of each does it need to go? Can you choose any charging station or it has to be Chevrolet? I've only ever seen Tesla charging stations...
Yes. Tesla is 100% electric with a huge battery range of 300+ miles. It needs electricity to run. If the battery runs out you’re stranded and must be towed. Tesla owners charge at home. Away from home they charge at public charging stations or Tesla’s “supercharging” network of fast chargers. They charge ~150 miles in about 30 Minutes.

The Chevrolet Volt is a plug-in hybrid. Other plug in hybrids are the Toyota Prius Prime, Ford Fusion Energy, BMW i8. They operate as electric vehicles but have much smaller range (20-50 miles) on electric power. The catch is they have an engine and switch to gas operation when that battery is depleted. They can run indefinitely on gas, just as a standard car. Since most owners commute less than 50 miles a day, they still are considered electric vehicles because they can be charged daily at home. Chevy discontinued the Volt because most owners weren’t even using the gas engine. Plug in hybrids and non-Tesla electric vehicles can use public charging stations also. However, they cannot use Tesla’s supercharging network.
 
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redskinsfan92

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Mercedes is reliable, but not cheap to own. Japanese cars are on the whole 'nother level of reliability. You can not touch Toyota or Lexus in terms of reliability. Then comes Honda. Nissan is not reliable, especially Nissan with an automatic. Misubishi is not reliable. Subaru is not reliable. For domestics, Ford over Chevy, always.

Reliability comes with proper maintenance. Oil should be changed every 3000 miles. Factory recommends every 15000 miles, and you have a problem right there.

What could possibly break in a car? Alternator and air conditioner is not a problem. Squicky water pump is not a problem. Balljoins and wheel bearings is not a problem. Problem is gearbox and engine. Japanese cars have excellent build tolerances, much more precise across the board, best quality control, this is why they are reliable. They are precision machines. Germans suck at reliability mainly because of inline 6 engines, those have long cranks and cams and they tend to bend at high rpm, chewing bearings. Chevy sucks because it uses pushrod engines. Ford is better, it has overcam V8, 4 times less wear and tear on camshafts.


Anything BMW and Mercedes, but not old. Mustang, Camarro, Corvette. Sporty oriental rice cars.
What's your take on Ford throwing Ecoboost engines in everything? Gotta be shortening engine life.
 

Gstring

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What's your take on Ford throwing Ecoboost engines in everything? Gotta be shortening engine life.
Blown engines have bigger effective displacement. https://www.autozine.org/technical_school/engine/Forced_Induction_2.html#Overview
It goes like this, NA engine operates at 1 bar.
So if your eco boost engine is 2.0 liters and on top of atmospheric pressure you blowing 15 psi into it, your effective displacement is 4 liters.

You have more parts to go bad with turbocharging. But it does not mean it won't last well past 150,000 miles (provided you doing 3,000 mile oil changes). Obviously, something else to standard naturally aspirated engines will break.

Ecoboost engines have chains, but the chains they use tend to break, at least it was one of the illnesses.

I wouldn't go with ford ecoboost engine, since neither Ford nor other domestics know how to make good small engines. For small engines you should go with Toyota and Honda, or Lexus and Acura. However, Ford is known for solid V8 engines. Money you overpay upfront is well worth it in the long run. However, if you don't care to keep your car for too long, Ford Focus manual could be a nice sporty choice.

P.S. - quick word on motor oils. Many think synthetic is the best type and should be used exclusively. It is only partly true. Synthetic is good for high heat, racing, traffic, and other high load conditions. Otherwise, for quick drives it can actually hurt your engine, as it never gets warm enough to work properly. You should be using whatever your manufacturer recommends, but not obeying their 15,000 mile oil change recommendations. Also, once you use one oil, stick to that oil. Don't be that guy that goes with whatever is cheapest at walmart. This causes oil deposits, clogage, and premature wear. Best oil is always your manufacturer's brand.
 
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Reyaj

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Yes. Tesla is 100% electric with a huge battery range of 300+ miles. It needs electricity to run. If the battery runs out you’re stranded and must be towed. Tesla owners charge at home. Away from home they charge at public charging stations or Tesla’s “supercharging” network of fast chargers. They charge ~150 miles in about 30 Minutes.

The Chevrolet Volt is a plug-in hybrid. Other plug in hybrids are the Toyota Prius Prime, Ford Fusion Energy, BMW i8. They operate as electric vehicles but have much smaller range (20-50 miles) on electric power. The catch is they have an engine and switch to gas operation when that battery is depleted. They can run indefinitely on gas, just as a standard car. Since most owners commute less than 50 miles a day, they still are considered electric vehicles because they can be charged daily at home. Chevy discontinued the Volt because most owners weren’t even using the gas engine. Plug in hybrids and non-Tesla electric vehicles can use public charging stations also. However, they cannot use Tesla’s supercharging network.
Great explanation, thanks so much! I think the only technical question I have is regarding Tesla's supercharging network... Does Tesla have regular charging stations and then these Supercharging ones? If so can non Tesla cars use the regular charging stations they have?

I feel like there is a push towards electronic cars... my fear is that there's not enough charging stations right now where I wouldn't want to be stranded somewhere if I ran out of power :(
 

Lookatu

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I think the only technical question I have is regarding Tesla's supercharging network... Does Tesla have regular charging stations and then these Supercharging ones? If so can non Tesla cars use the regular charging stations they have?
Tesla has both "Supercharger" stations and "Destination" chargers. Non Tesla cars can use the destination chargers with an appropriate adapter if they want to charge from it. These are mostly the 220v ~30-40amp variety and can be found at some businesses, hotels, etc. These are naturally going to be slower in charging than your supercharger so you'll need to plan accordingly.
 

wifehunter

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So do you guys think gas cars will become obsolete?
Maybe.....if solid state battery tech becomes easy to manufacture.
 

Reyaj

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Maybe.....if solid state battery tech becomes easy to manufacture.
Maybe.....if solid state battery tech becomes easy to manufacture.
How much time do you think it will take for gas cars to no longer be relevant? If you were getting a new car would you still look at a gas one for now?
 

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EyeBRollin

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So do you guys think gas cars will become obsolete?
No, not completely. The tech will make gas inferior in drivability and reliability. However, U.S. infrastructure is configured for petrol auto use. The highway network is mostly vast and rural expanses between cities. That makes electric vehicles impractical for road trips. The problem will be even worse when electric vehicles become a bigger market share, as there are only so many public charging stations that can be installed. That will become a supply and demand issue. Electric cars are great for commuting, but not suitable for long haul trips.
 

Lookatu

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Electric cars are great for commuting, but not suitable for long haul trips.
I would recommend electric if possible but keep at least one gas engine in the household.
This.

In addition to not being optimal for long haul trips, they aren't the best for towing either as it greatly reduces the miles.

Just to give you an idea, the Tesla Semi-Truck coming out needs 7 times the batteries of the largest capacity Model Y SUV to achieve any decent range with towing a load.

I have two electric cars and a few gas cars. Although I've taken my Tesla on 8 hour road trips, you have to factor in the recharge time in between. We mostly use our electric cars for city driving or running errands.

Personally I think it will be 15-20 years until most go electric, mainly due to infrastructure, raw materials, recycling, charging, and cost issues.
 

wifehunter

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How much time do you think it will take for gas cars to no longer be relevant? If you were getting a new car would you still look at a gas one for now?
I'd get a Prius, or Corolla hybrid for now.

Solid state battery tech is very close to being 'a thing'. But, it's not there yet.
 

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It seems like a smart addition to an all electric car would be to carry a little honda gas powered generator in the trunk just in case you end up in a situation where you can get gasoline, but not electricity.
 
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