How much time do you give a new coworker?

The LadyKiller

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#1
About a month ago, my company hired a new employee at my position. The boss wants to promote me, but needs people who can do my current job before that can happen. The new employee has a good work ethic - he arrives on time, works hard, but is struggling to accomplish basic tasks. On days when I am with the new employee, things ultimately turn out ok because I become a safety net and will catch any mistakes before they are submitted, while also showing the new employee the right way to do the task. On the days I am not working with him, however, there are some big-time struggles. One of my supervisors told me it takes him an hour to complete tasks that should take 5 minutes. Puzzling, because I've trained the employee on those tasks multiple times.

Today, my boss asked me to send him a written evaluation of the new employee by the end of the week. According to a supervisor and some of my other coworkers, he falls back into mistakes he shouldn't be making when I, the safety net, am not there to steer him in the right direction. Because of the frequency of errors, my boss isn't sure the new employee will make it.

On one hand, I want the new employee to succeed. He has good character traits, had experience in the field and our company is looking to increase its workforce. On the other hand, his performance is underwhelming. We knew overall knowledge of what we cover would be a weakness, but not to the extent that it would cripple his ability to complete a simple task (to be clear, he does succeed in some areas of the job, but fails miserably in others). I've never been in management, and my superiors have seen many more people come and go, giving them a better overall sense of judgement. From purely a performance standpoint, how much time do you give a new coworker to sink or swim?
 
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#2
Depends on the job scope. Elaborate on it.

Normal repetitive job scope is 2 weeks mentorship and review will be at the end of 3 months.

For more challenging job scope, 1to 3 months mentorship and review at the end of 6 months.

This is the normal standard.

For management positions (managers and above) - you're on ur own and review is based on unit/department profit.
 

evan12

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#3
About a month ago, my company hired a new employee at my position. The boss wants to promote me, but needs people who can do my current job before that can happen. The new employee has a good work ethic - he arrives on time, works hard, but is struggling to accomplish basic tasks. On days when I am with the new employee, things ultimately turn out ok because I become a safety net and will catch any mistakes before they are submitted, while also showing the new employee the right way to do the task. On the days I am not working with him, however, there are some big-time struggles. One of my supervisors told me it takes him an hour to complete tasks that should take 5 minutes. Puzzling, because I've trained the employee on those tasks multiple times.

Today, my boss asked me to send him a written evaluation of the new employee by the end of the week. According to a supervisor and some of my other coworkers, he falls back into mistakes he shouldn't be making when I, the safety net, am not there to steer him in the right direction. Because of the frequency of errors, my boss isn't sure the new employee will make it.

On one hand, I want the new employee to succeed. He has good character traits, had experience in the field and our company is looking to increase its workforce. On the other hand, his performance is underwhelming. We knew overall knowledge of what we cover would be a weakness, but not to the extent that it would cripple his ability to complete a simple task (to be clear, he does succeed in some areas of the job, but fails miserably in others). I've never been in management, and my superiors have seen many more people come and go, giving them a better overall sense of judgement. From purely a performance standpoint, how much time do you give a new coworker to sink or swim?
It look like he lack training , maybe sit with him and suggest to him some learning materials, also some employees doesnt think their mistake is a big deal , so if you think it is a big deal let him know.
 

The LadyKiller

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#4
I waited to respond to see if he improved. He hasn't. In fact, he is regressing, even when I walkthrough his work to show him where improvements could be made. There is a good chance he will lose his job once we find a replacement.

The industry I work in relies on making deadlines and being accurate with information. He is failing miserably in both. Just this week, my supervisor gave him an assignment that needed to be published in three hours. At most, it should take one hour to complete. At 2:40 into the assignment, I noticed half the elements are missing. I asked the new employee if there was a holdup and where he was struggling. He didn't want to admit he were falling behind, so he didn't say anything. I took over and we hit our deadline, but that behavior can't be tolerated. We could have gotten in a lot of trouble.

Another instance was a simply transferring of information to show the major headlines of the day. Easy. When it came to presentation time, all of his information was from weeks earlier - instead of the current day. Even though we're in February, the new employee "didn't see the big deal" with headlines from early January being shown. His awareness is at 0.

What's perhaps the worst quality is that the new employee has said he'd rather mess up an assignment and thus hurt the team (to get the learning experience of doing an assignment himself) rather than me swooping in to save the day every time I realize he's not going to make his deadline.
 
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