Correcting coworker's errors that could affect you...how to handle?

The LadyKiller

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The company I work at functions out of two locations. One project we complete each day becomes a collaboration between employees at my level from both branches. Because I am essentially the point person carrying carry out the final product, I do my best to ensure nothing falls through the cracks. Lately, however, I've found myself having to correct the increasing number of obvious mistakes my same-level peers are making. Righting their wrongs comes at the expense of getting everything done in plenty of time, as we're often completing things right up to the deadline.

Predictably, my same-level peers are upset with me because they don't feel I should be checking their work, and that doing so takes up precious time. I try to nicely explain that I have to put a second pair of eyes on it because of the increasing number of errors (they don't buy this). If I let them go, I will get at least some of the blame from my boss. If I fill in the remaining blanks first, I probably won't have time to scan for errors. Management would absolutely prefer one piece of the project isn't completed (we can hide it if prepared) over there being a mistake on something that is completed (can't hide that).

Management is aware of what's happening and 100% supports me on this issue - in fact, they're the ones prompting me to check everything in the first place! My boss and supervisors trust my judgment and want me on our major projects because they know the work will be correct. But how do I handle this situation and rising animosity with my same-level peers? I don't want to explicitly say I have reason not to trust their work, but in reality, that is the truth.
 

Spaz

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Stop correcting them at the expense of their reputation with management.

Start leading them by teaching them how they can reduce their errors.

Gaining respect from peers will gain the admiration of management - that will fast track ur rise into management.

The ability to lead people is a highly sought trait by companies.
 

The LadyKiller

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Stop correcting them at the expense of their reputation with management.

Start leading them by teaching them how they can reduce their errors.
As the title of my post says, their errors affect my reputation with management. I'm not their superior or their boss, but if I present something with anyone's errors on it, I will still receive part of the blame. I am specifically instructed to check for errors.

I spoke with one of my unhappy peers what his concerns are and what we can do to get on the same page. I discovered it's a different in mindsets between me and some of the peers in regards to priorities. The peers prefer I build out the rest of the project first and then check it. I prefer to work my way from top to bottom, regardless of what's built first, to make sure we're buttoned up all the way. If my a** is on the line, I want to see everything.
 

Spaz

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I suspect that u r over reacting or even angling for attention from ur immediate superior - the supervisor.

And you're not even at a supervisory level.

Follow my advice and stick to it.

Or explain it detail ur job function, type of industry and levels of management in ur company, I will then be in a better position to advise accordingly.
 

Xenom0rph

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As long as management knows you're the one going the extra mile to make sure things get done, I would use this as a bargaining chip for a promotion or more pay.
 

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The LadyKiller

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As long as management knows you're the one going the extra mile to make sure things get done, I would use this as a bargaining chip for a promotion or more pay.
This is the likely course of action. They are certainly aware of what I do.

I did not mention this in the OP, but my boss met with me a couple of months ago about checking over others work to cut down on errors. He felt those helping did not feel accountable. And you know what? It's worked.

Now that this boss and I are at the new branch, those at the old branch appear more lax. It's why my same-level peers are complaining again. Fortunately for me, my boss will continue to let me do what I feel is best for the end product. I simply want everyone at my level to be on the same page and work as one cohesive unit.
 
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