Protein Powder

BackInTheGame78

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Soy gets a bad rap. Nutritionally it is the most “complete” source of plant protein.
It's also the source of mineral and nutrient leaching phytic acid, enzyme disrupting compounds and phytoestrogens.

Essentially soy is an anti-nutrient in unfermented form, and actually pretty healthy with numerous benefits when eaten in moderation in fermented form(tempeh).
 

Stoic

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Almost all protein powders are loaded with a bunch of junk. You’re better of getting protein from real foods. I stopped using protein powder and I’ve had zero issues putting on muscle. I do eat a lot of baked chicken breasts though
definitely better, but for me, it makes it more difficult to get the 175g of protein or so I need everyday. That’s a lot of eggs and chicken breasts and fish to get that high. Not impossible though.
 

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Almost all protein powders are loaded with a bunch of junk. You’re better of getting protein from real foods. I stopped using protein powder and I’ve had zero issues putting on muscle. I do eat a lot of baked chicken breasts though
Simply not true. Go look a quality unflavored green pea and brown rice protein and tell me what you find.
 

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definitely better, but for me, it makes it more difficult to get the 175g of protein or so I need everyday. That’s a lot of eggs and chicken breasts and fish to get that high. Not impossible though.
The requirement for muscle is actually really only 0.69g per pound of lean muscle but to be even double sure the researchers bumped it to 0.82g per pound of lean muscle. No difference was found.

Ironically as you become better trained your requirements for protein actually go down, not up, as you are creating less damage than a newly trained person is. For a 200 lb person, this caps their protein requirement around 115-125g max.

The reason high amounts of protein are recommended is not due to the muscle building effects, this is rate limited by enzymes for muscle growth, it is due to the thermic effect of protein and its effect on metabolism.

Calories have to come from somewhere, and it is better to get them from something that has a thermic effect of 30-40% versus carbs at 10-15% or fats at 3%. This means energy is burned utilizing protein far more than carbs, which has a positive metabolic effect overall on your body.
 

EyeBRollin

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My understanding is that protein should be 10%-30% of total calories with 10% being the lowest to prevent deficiency. How this works out:

2,000 calories = 50g to 150g

3,000 calories = 75g to 225g

4,000 calories = 100g to 300g

It’s a broad range. However, if you are at 3,000+ calories you probably want to trend more into replacing some of that protein with healthy carbs.
 

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My understanding is that protein should be 10%-30% of total calories with 10% being the lowest to prevent deficiency. How this works out:

2,000 calories = 50g to 150g

3,000 calories = 75g to 225g

4,000 calories = 100g to 300g

It’s a broad range. However, if you are at 3,000+ calories you probably want to trend more into replacing some of that protein with healthy carbs.
Personally I use the following splits for the most part:

Low carb days: 15-20% carb, 40% protein, 40-45% fat

Med carb days: 30% carb, 40% protein, 30% fat

High carb days: 40-45% carb, 40% protein, 15-20% fat.

Occasionally I will bump protein down to 35% or up to 45% here and there but for the most part it stays stable, although the real numbers usually end up a few points up or down from those based on what I eat during that day, it's rarely perfect.

Calories on high carb days are usually around 2400, med carb days 2300 and low carb days 2150, although those are adjusting slowly downward for now as I continue to lose weight.

Once I get to a good spot I will start working on slowly rebuilding by upping my calories counts.
 
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BackInTheGame78

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Yes Its fun to see how many here have no idea about a healthy diet, especially the mods.. Brainwashed by society to think that brown rice is healthier then white rice and that pea protein is a great protein source, just shows how many People are Beta Male followers ;)
It's funny how the people who think they know so much don't even know what they don't know.

Pea protein is a great source of protein. It's one of the only vegetables that is high in leucine but you probably have no idea why that's even important, so I won't waste time bothering to explain it.

Based on recent blood work and being down 43 lbs in under 4 months I'd probably say I am pretty good with diet.
 

Money & Muscle

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Low carb days: 15-20% carb, 40% protein, 40-45% fat

Med carb days: 30% carb, 40% protein, 30% fat

High carb days: 40-45% carb, 40% protein, 15-20% fat.
Try lowering your fats to 0.3g/lb total bodyweight and backfilling with carbs. Unless you need higher fats for digestion, 0.3g/lb is all that's needed to support hormones.

If you're on TRT, you can drop fats even lower than that.
 

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Try lowering your fats to 0.3g/lb total bodyweight and backfilling with carbs. Unless you need higher fats for digestion, 0.3g/lb is all that's needed to support hormones.

If you're on TRT, you can drop fats even lower than that.
On low carb days it's higher than that and on high carb days it's lower than that...when you average it out over the week, that's right around my average for fat intake per day.
 

Money & Muscle

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On low carb days it's higher than that and on high carb days it's lower than that...when you average it out over the week, that's right around my average for fat intake per day.
Right, what I'm saying is that natty folks need 0.3g/lb fat intake for optimal hormone support. More than that does not improve hormones, less than that hurts it. You may find it beneficial to keep it right at 0.3g/lb. FWIW, NASM recommends like .23g/lb or something - I prefer the conservative approach.

If you're higher fats on some days - you're getting no added value out of it. if you're lower fats on other days, you are negatively impacting your hormones on that day. The net result is that you hurt your hormonal support.
 

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The Quote fits perfectly to you because you didnt even ask why it is unhealthier, but instead felt free to judge. Shot in your own leg. All I can say is that I have perfect blood works, Hormon levels you will ever get to see in Paper and that only with real food without any bs supplements
I've read plenty of articles and studies from many different places and haven't seen a single one that said anything bad about it. In fact, overwhelmingly good things are said about it, including benefits other than muscle building.

I'm sure you have some psuedo-science ready to go tho, so feel free to expound on it.
 

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Right, what I'm saying is that natty folks need 0.3g/lb fat intake for optimal hormone support. More than that does not improve hormones, less than that hurts it. You may find it beneficial to keep it right at 0.3g/lb. FWIW, NASM recommends like .23g/lb or something - I prefer the conservative approach.

If you're higher fats on some days - you're getting no added value out of it. if you're lower fats on other days, you are negatively impacting your hormones on that day. The net result is that you hurt your hormonal support.
In a vacuum that may be true but our bodies don't work in a vacuum.
 

Money & Muscle

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In a vacuum that may be true but our bodies don't work in a vacuum.
I'm not understanding... all data points to 0.3g/lb fat intake as minimal required for optimal performance. Would you add water to your gasoline one day just to add 93 octane boost the next? The net result is a loss.

If you think what you're doing is the best way to do it - go right ahead. I was offering input that is supported by all current data that you could use or ignore. Not looking to argue with someone who doesn't want to follow what's worked for all of the biggest dudes I know.
 

Stoic

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I take that back...Sunwarrior makes premade shakes with 30g of protein that contain Green Pea, Brown Rice and Pumpkin Seed Protein...
nice, I’m going to order it and give it a try And compare against the whey.

good analysis on protein grams needed btw. Standard advice on protein grams needed was 1 gram per body weight desired. You probably remember that. Schwartzeneger did it in his day. But, it makes sense that we don’t need quite that much. I’m sure we just crap out a lot of the excess the body can’t utilize anyhow. .8x of body weight sounds reasonable to me.
 
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