Electric Cars

BillyPilgrim

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EV's are a NO-GO until we get rid of our corrupt and satanic global leadership. This goes for anything that's "cutting-edge".

The only exception to this has been the internet, which was such a huge mistake it's sealed their doom. So they will push sh1t like crazy as they go down fighting.

@Kotaix you should know better bro.
 

RickTheToad

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Thanks for the question. I'll shed some light. There are two kinds of electric vehicles:

Full Electric - (i.e. Tesla Models, Chevrolet Bolt, Nissan Leaf) These have huge batteries lasting 150+ miles, with the largest batteries over 300 miles of total range.

Plug-In Hybrid (i.e. Chevrolet Volt, Toyota Prius Prime, BMW i8) These are "transitional electric vehicles" that were designed to bridge the gap between gas and electric. All automakers have these options available but they won't market them because it is difficult to explain to customers. These have small batteries (10-50 miles range) but a fully operational gas engine once the battery is depleted. In short, they are a Tesla on electric mode, but a conventional hybrid (i.e Toyota Prius) under gas mode. They can run on gas indefinitely, and take road trips just like a regular car. You never have to charge these if you are unable to find charging.

Now to your question - There are 3 ways to charge an electric vehicle:

Level 1: This is with a standard kitchen duplex outlet. All electric vehicles come with an adapter that will plug into any 110V outlet. Recharge rate is about 4 miles per charging hour. It takes 3-4 days to charge a fully electric car, and about 12 hours to charge a Plug-In Hybrid

Level 2: This is with a 240 Volt Charging Station. Most EV owners purchase this for their home. These are also found in shopping malls, parking garages, and airports. Recharge rate is about 20 miles per charging hour. It takes 8-10 hours to fully charge an electric car, and just 2 hours to charge a Plug-in Hybrid

Level 3: This is called "fast charging." These are usually found at rest areas. Tesla Superchargers are at this level, but are encrypted so that only Teslas can use them. Recharge rate is about 300 miles per hour. They can fully charge most electric vehicles in 45 minutes. Plug-in Hybrids cannot use these.

Most EV drivers do not charge publicly, with the exceptions being parking garages and road trips. Parking garage charging is usually "free" because it is included in the cost of parking. Outside of garages, the cost of public chargers is usually at least 5X more expensive than charging at home. They are owned and serviced by private companies, so they aren't well regulated. Also, it's common to go to a charging station and it is either broken, taken, or the spot is just blocked by a non-EV because someone is being a scrub.

Also, utility companies don't advertise this- but they have time of use power plans. This is useful for anyone without solar panels on their home. I have a time of use plan. Standard electricity for me was $.13 / KwH, but now I pay $.17 / kwH during the day and just $.06 overnight. My car has a 15 kW battery, so each charge costs about $1 and I get 53 miles of juice. A 100kWh Tesla would cost me about $7 to fully charge at home for 300 miles of juice. If you convert that it in $ it is roughly 150 MPG.
I'll prob. get an electric vehicle in the next few years. What they should do though is build in solar charging in the roof of the vehicle. Since Tesla owns SolarCity, they must be working on the conversion of those solar roof tiles for the car. Now, that would be an answer to the cumbstion engine issue. However, I think we at least a decade away from that. Plus, Tesla should then be forced to sell/lease, at a fair price to all vehicle manufactures for the good of the climate. Musk would then be a trillionaire; so he may not care.
 

EyeBRollin

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I'll prob. get an electric vehicle in the next few years. What they should do though is build in solar charging in the roof of the vehicle. Since Tesla owns SolarCity, they must be working on the conversion of those solar roof tiles for the car.
I think they explored that already. If I recall, the amount of energy harnessed by the roof surface area is insufficient to power the car. As for battery regeneration that is already included in the brakes of every hybrid & electric car. The energy in these batteries is ALOT. Moving a 2 ton vehicle at high speed takes a lot of power…
 

zekko

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the cost of public chargers is usually at least 5X more expensive than charging at home.
I was wondering about trips, where you would have to charge your vehicle every hour (or so I've read - you don't want to drain the battery if you want to recharge it quickly. Forget the hybrids for the moment). So from what you're saying, I'm guessing it's about $7 to publicly charge your car for an hour's worth of driving? How long would that take at a station?
 

Pierce Manhammer

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When we go grid down that Tesla is going to be a paperweight. Stack fuel and ammo and stack it deep. That or Ev panels…

Look at the Ukraine, probably can’t give away an electric vehicle there right now.

Seriously though, there are apps that will tell you where all the super chargers are and their cost.
 

Kotaix

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When we go grid down that Tesla is going to be a paperweight. Stack fuel and ammo and stack it deep. That or Ev panels…
You can't brew gasoline in your garage. ICE engines are entirely dependent on the drilling and refining infrastructure. But electricity can be produced in many different ways that don't involve oil. If the grid goes down you can at least get creative with EVs.

The only drive technology that is more versatile than electric is steam

@Kotaix you should know better bro.
I'm not sure what you're on about. I don't like the non-user-serviceable nature of EVs, but this is becoming true of ICE vehicles too.
 

Pierce Manhammer

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Diesel fuel can be made from vegetable oil and some Diesel engines can be modified to even run on straight vegetable oil as well or just about any oil, provided it’s viscosity can be made close to that of jp4, usually by the application of heat which can come from the engine itself once it’s running.

Most people do not know that the original Diesel engine was designed to run oil peanut oil.


You can't brew gasoline in your garage. ICE engines are entirely dependent on the drilling and refining infrastructure. But electricity can be produced in many different ways that don't involve oil. If the grid goes down you can at least get creative with EVs.

The only drive technology that is more versatile than electric is steam


I'm not sure what you're on about. I don't like the non-user-serviceable nature of EVs, but this is becoming true of ICE vehicles too.
 

EyeBRollin

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I was wondering about trips, where you would have to charge your vehicle every hour (or so I've read - you don't want to drain the battery if you want to recharge it quickly. Forget the hybrids for the moment). So from what you're saying, I'm guessing it's about $7 to publicly charge your car for an hour's worth of driving? How long would that take at a station?
Publicly charging an EV is comparable to fill the gas tank. It’s more like $30-$40. It takes about 45 minutes from a level 3 charger. That charge will last as long as it takes you to drive 80-90% of the cars range, which is 200-250 miles for most cars.
 

Bokanovsky

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Diesel fuel can be made from vegetable oil and some Diesel engines can be modified to even run on straight vegetable oil as well or just about any oil, provided it’s viscosity can be made close to that of jp4, usually by the application of heat which can come from the engine itself once it’s running.

Most people do not know that the original Diesel engine was designed to run oil peanut oil.
The most sustainable way to fuel an automobile is biodiesel. 100% renewable energy. The U.S. has vast amounts of farmland that can be used for growing corn and other plants used for biodiesel production. The fact that biodiesel has not become mainstream has everything to do with politics and nothing to do with technology and common sense. It would be far easier to switch to biodiesel as opposed to EV's. Better fro the environment too, as you don't have to strip mine the planet for rare earth minerals.
 

RickTheToad

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I think they explored that already. If I recall, the amount of energy harnessed by the roof surface area is insufficient to power the car. As for battery regeneration that is already included in the brakes of every hybrid & electric car. The energy in these batteries is ALOT. Moving a 2 ton vehicle at high speed takes a lot of power…
True, but the tech. to convert and store this power has yet to be finalized. I am sure the Tesla boys are working on ways to harness this power and store in some sort of onboard battery storage compartment. Kinetic energy is a fascinating phenomenon.
 

EyeBRollin

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True, but the tech. to convert and store this power has yet to be finalized. I am sure the Tesla boys are working on ways to harness this power and store in some sort of onboard battery storage compartment. Kinetic energy is a fascinating phenomenon.
It is. Regenerative braking is a marvel of its own. I have 150,000 miles on my Volt and its friction (conventional) brakes have no wear on them at all. @Reyaj another thing to note is you will likely never need a brake replacement on an EV. They barely ever use them.
 

BriBri

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I believe the problem is that Tesla wants to be, and is, a technology company....not a car company.
 
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The concern that I have is the charge time, I'm currently living in a condo and no way I can charge from home. I also WFH so I'll need to leave the car at a chargepoint for a few hours. Those in a similar situation, has that affected your normal routine?

Any recommendations for a 'sporty' EV in the $80-100K range? Not too keen on Tesla, was looking at the Audi

 

BriBri

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And.....What is this hype about Cadillac's new $300K EV....seriously?
 

EyeBRollin

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The concern that I have is the charge time, I'm currently living in a condo and no way I can charge from home. I also WFH so I'll need to leave the car at a chargepoint for a few hours. Those in a similar situation, has that affected your normal routine?

Any recommendations for a 'sporty' EV in the $80-100K range? Not too keen on Tesla, was looking at the Audi
Does your condo have a garage? Do you have a detached garage?

I live in a garden-style condo community. I had an underground conduit run from my electric meter in the common basement to my detached garage. It cost a couple grand but I already recouped that and more.

Check out the Ford Mustang Mach-E or the Jaguar I-Pace.
 
M

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Does your condo have a garage? Do you have a detached garage?

I live in a garden-style condo community. I had an underground conduit run from my electric meter in the common basement to my detached garage. It cost a couple grand but I already recouped that and more.

Check out the Ford Mustang Mach-E or the Jaguar I-Pace.
I'm renting and only have a carport with no outlet.

Looking at the BMW i4 M50, but I wish it came in a 2-door config
 

Kotaix

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The most sustainable way to fuel an automobile is biodiesel. 100% renewable energy. The U.S. has vast amounts of farmland that can be used for growing corn and other plants used for biodiesel production. The fact that biodiesel has not become mainstream has everything to do with politics and nothing to do with technology and common sense. It would be far easier to switch to biodiesel as opposed to EV's. Better fro the environment too, as you don't have to strip mine the planet for rare earth minerals.
The problems I see with biodiesel are
how much land do you have to switch from food production to vegetable oil production.
how much wild habitat needs to be converted to agriculture (destroyed) in order to meet fuel demand.
how much water you'll need to irrigate those crops.

Of these, water is the limiting factor. Many agricultural areas in the US are already operating at unsustainable levels of water consumption, and all the good agricultural areas are already taken.

If biodiesel has a future, it's via microbial production. This is how brazil did it with alcohol production in the late 70s.

But just as internal combustion can be adapted to use different fuels, electric vehicle technology can and will change over time to be more environmentally friendly. An electric drivetrain is superior to internal combustion, the only problem it has right now is energy storage density.
 

Bokanovsky

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The problems I see with biodiesel are
how much land do you have to switch from food production to vegetable oil production.
Not much. North America has a sh!t ton of excess agricultural land. The amount of land actively used for agriculture is actually shrinking.

On a side note, farmers have been lobbying the government to mandate a higher percentage of ethanol fuel additives for decades. Ethanol is a biofuel. You can easily convert an existing ICE engine to run on E-85 (85% ethanol, 15% gasoline) or even pure ethanol.
 
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Reyaj

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Great responses on this...

So public charging stations cost money?? I thought they were free :(

Are there travel chargers you can bring in the car itself?

One negative I heard is that if it's too cold out the battery drains faster than a charger can charge it, is that true?
 
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